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Full text of "Battlefield, 1913"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/battlefield191300univ 



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" Jnd only the Master shall praise us, and 
only the Master shall blame; 
And no one shall work for money, and no 
I one shall work for fame; 

But each for the joy of working; and each 

in his separate star, 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees it for the 
God of Things as they are!" 



THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 
1913 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



y 



The Editor's Wail 

E slept and dreamed sweet dreams 
Of peace beyond compare ; 
Annual "stuff" appeared in reams 
Without an editor's care. 

We woke. Before our eyes, 
Unused to drudgeries' woe, 
Were naanuscripts — sources of sighs- 
In stacks both high and low. 

The midnight oil we burned ; 
We flecked our hair with gray. 
For fame at first we yearned. 
But 'tis not so today. 

Take this completed task, 
Ye critics, as ye may ; 
Your mercy we do not ask, 
For we worked for love, not pay. 



-Editor. 



±44396 




^^/*« Univer-i'itv "^ 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Calendar for 1912-13 



September 12 — Opening of school. 

" 13-14 — Matriculation. 

" 20 — Getting acquainted; Y. "W. C. A. reception. 

" 21 — Glee Club entertains. 

" 26 — Address by Ex-Governor Swanson. 
26— County Fair. 

October 5 — Tacky Party. 

" 5 — President Russell moved into his new home. 

" 31 — Darkues.s — ghosts and witches parade. 

November 8 — Lecture by Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, of Universitj' of Virginia. 

" 15 — Danger! Fire drill. 

" 19 — Election of The Battlefield staff. 

" 23 — Basketball victory. 

" 25 — Lecture by Mr. George C. Round of Board of Trustees. 

' ' 28 — Thanksgiving. , 

December 6 — Lecture by Dr. W. M. Forrest of University of Virginia. 

" 7 — Fun seekers take a trip to Washington to see Peter Pan. 

12— Y. W. C. A. Bazaar. 

" 13 — Fiftieth anniversary of Battle of Fredericksburg. 

" 16 — Alice in Wonderland — a great success. 

" 20 — Going home. 

January 17 — First Professionals perform a few stunts. 

' ' 21 — Lecture by Ex-Governor Montague. 

25— Book Party— Y. W. C. A. 

" 31— Illustrated lecture by Mr. T. S. Settle. 

February 3-7 — Examinations. 

' ' 10 — Lecture by Miss Vivian Conway. 

" 11-15 — Pictures taken for The Battlefield. 

" 13 — Glee Club Recital. 

21— Lecture by Mr. C. G. Maphis. 

" 22 — Reception to students by Student Activities Committee. 

" 28 — Richmond Glee Club concert. 

March 4 — Students and Faculty attend the Inauguration. 

" 15 — Minstrel Show — Senior Class. 
21-24— Easter. 



TO OUR PRESIDENT 

EDWARD HUTSON RUSSELL 

WHOSE LIFE HAS BEEN ONE OF SELF-SACRIFICING 
DEVOTION TO THE EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS OF 
HIS NATIVE STATE AND WHOSE SIGNAL SUC- 
CESS IN LAYING THE FOUNDATION OF 
THIS INSTITUTION HAS MADE IT A 
STRONG BULWARK AGAINST 
THE FORCES OF IGNO- 
RANCE AND ERROR 
THIS VOLUME IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED 
BY THE CLASS OF 1913 




1. 



riiiiiiiiijMMiiiiiiMMtiii^ 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Board of Trustees 

DR. J. A. C. CHANDLER, Richmond. 

JOHN T. DANIEL, Cape CUiarles. 

HON. ALDEN BELL, Culpeper. 

CHARLES G. MAPHIS, Charlottesville. 

DR. A. S. KEMPER, Lynnwood. 

GEORGE C. ROUND, Manassas. 

PETER J. WHITE, Richmond. 

HON. S. W. HOLT, Newport News. 

HON. C. 'CONOR GOOLRICK, Fredericksburg. 

HON. R. C. STEARNES, JR., Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio, 
Richmond. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



The Battlefield Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 
MARTHA BELLE PEARCE. 



Assistant Editors 



BUFORD KIRTLEY LYNE 



ETHEL LOUISE TAYLOR 



Business Manager 
GAl^ VAUGHAN WILSON 

Assistant Business Manager 
LOUISE LEWIS 



Art 
JULIA KEATON 



Department Editors 

31 u sic 

KATHARINE BARTENSTEIN 



Poetry 
ELSIE COLEMAN 



Wit 
ISABEL WILLIS 



Society 
MYRTIS TANKARD 



Athletics 
MARY W. JOHNSON 



Class Editors 



ANNA DIEDRICH, '13 
GRAHAM MASTIN '14 
ELIZABETH CHENERY '15 



ELIZA PEIRCE '16 
EMMA LAWLESS '17 
ETHEL BULLOCK '18 



Advisory Committee 



A. B. CHANDLER, JR. 
OLIVE M. HINMAN 



VIRGINIA M. GOOLRICK 
DORA J. DADMUN 



THE BATTLEFIELD 





W. N. HAMLET 
Mathematics and Science 



A. B. CHANDLER, JE. 

Latin aud Oeograpliy 





B. Y. TYNER 

EiUii.-ation 



VIRGINIA E. STONE 

Primary Methods 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




*^i 




FRANCES L. WITHERS 

Houfcholil Arts 



CAROLINE R. JACKSON 

Rural Arts 





■|^ 



>e 



OLIVER M. HINMAN 

Manual Arts and Drawing 



VIRGINIA M. GOOLRICK 

History and Civics 



THE BATTLEFIELD 





DORA J. DADMUN 

Euglish 



ANNIE I. ANTHONY 

Modern Languages 





MAKGAEET FKASEK 

Director of Music 



GARY GRAVES 

Director Physical Education 



THE BATTLEFIELD 





MARION C. FORBES 

Head of Home and Eeeistrar 



C. MASON SMITH 

Physician 





NORA C. WILLIS 

Instructor in Instrumental Music 



GUNYON M. HARRISON 

Supt. Elect. Dept. and Asst. in Mathematics 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




The Crazy Old Bell 

ROM before the break of day 

Till the lights go out at night, 
Till the footsteps of Miss Forbes, 

Which sound so soft and light, 
Have echoed softly down the halls 

And we all get out of sight, 
There 's one thing that 's a worry — 

Normal girls will say I 'm right — 
It's that crazy old bell. 

No matter if you're snoozing; 

You staid out late at a feast; 
Perhaps;, you have a test today; 

Till twelve you studied at least; 
Long before your eyes can see 

The day dawn in the East, 
You can hear the awful clanging. 

Which you think will never cease. 
It 's that crazy old bell. 

The same thing happens in the morn 

When you 're making up your bed ; 
You hardly have the time to tuck 

The covers at the head; 
Your hair has not been combed today. 

Nor tied your ribbons red. 
Oh! what do you think mother would say? 

But the fault, as I have said 
Is that crazy old bell. 

The con 's outweigh the pro 's ; 

But there 's one time, I declare, 
When, if that bell should wake the dead, 

I certainly wouldn 't care ; 
For dinner is a thing which we 

Consider is too rare, 
And even for tough steak and hash, 

I 'd race you down the stair. 
Bless that crazy old bell! 

And that 's the way it always is ; 

It keeps us on the go. 
And if our heads weren 't on right tight. 

We'd lose them all, I know. 
Won 't we be glad when every thing 

Can go along just so, 
Without a thing to wake us up. 

And we can be right slow 
Without that crazy old bell ? 

16 Nannie Oliver. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



The Battlefield 



When first this school began to wage 

Against society's foes 
A war in which all should engage 

To lessen human woes, 

Our forty-two of maidens fair, 

Arrayed for right and truth. 
Decided it should be their care 

To help their country's youth. 

So thru that year we bravely fought 
Toward the goal that we desired. 

And strove to learn whate'er was taught, 
With that ambition fired. 

But when we pitched our tents once more, 

Ten comrades were away; 
The rest made up a steady corps 

Alert for work and play. 

And towards our goal we've striven each day 

As Lee would have us do. 
We've tried in work and tried in play 

To our colors to be true. 

Here where so many men have fought 
With all their strength and might. 

Here where our brave forefathers sought 
To win what they thought right; 



On this dear spot with mem 'ries filled 

Of soldiers true and brave; 
Here where so many men were killed — 

So many found a grave; 

Here we have fought our fight as well 

As those brave men of old; 
For tho no one by bullet fell, 

A battle o 'er us rolled. 

And now at last this war is o 'er, 
These battles fought and w'on. 

And many hearts are sad and sore 
To think school life is done. 

We now go to a broader field. 

The broader field of life. 
And to its foes we '11 never yield, 

But stiU keep up the strife 

Against those ancient hated foes. 

Of ignorance and woe; 
This is the warfare each one chose; 

To battle now we go. 

Those foes are still within our land; 

Our country needs the brave ; 
We each have given heart and hand 

Our nation 's youth to save. 

Elsie Coleman. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Motto : Ijive on the Heights 



Class 1913 



Flower: Sweet Pea 



Colors: Lavender and Green 



The fragrant flowery days of June have come to us again. 

But we view their golden splendor with a gladness fraught with pain. 

They bid us cease from labor, and we find that message sweet. 

Yet they bring another message which our hearts ache to repeat. 

Chorus 

Dear Class of 1913, we tonight must say farewell, 

The sorrow that we feel at this no mortal tongue can tell. 

For two short years we've toiled here, and now our work is o'er, 

We part tonight to meet again, united never more. 

We now must leave" the Normal where we 've spent such happy hours, 
And our sorrow at this thought now plans for future .joy o 'erpowers,- 
Tho ' we 've often longed for freedom when our world appeared unkind, 
We realize that with it we must leave school joj-s behind. 

We now must leave school life, and leave each privilege and rule, 
For we are passing from school life to life 's great glorious school. 
Here we have been preparing for the work that we must do. 
For the world is needing workers who have pro^-en tried and true. 

To leave our comrades makes us sad and fills our hearts with pain, 

We know this happy company will never meet again. 

The brightest gem of memory's crown is that whose shining rays, 

Brings back the recollection of these hapjjy past school days. Elsie Coleman. 

19 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



KATHARINE BAETENSTEIN 
Warreuton, Virginia 




"Katrine," "Kit, 



'Aurora BoreaUs" 



Katharine 's sure to be much in demand 
If any good singing is planned. 

She accompanies well 

And our singers can tell 
That this art is too rare in tlie land. 

Vice-President Class, 1912-13 
Music Editor The Battlefield 
Vice-President Glee Club, 1912-13 
Secretary-Treasurer Eed-Headed Club 
Secretary Y. W. C. A., 1912-13 
Chairman Social Committee Y. W. C. A., 19: 
Accompanist Glee Club, 1911-12-13 
Woodrow Wilson Literary Society 
Better-to-Sew My Dear Club 
Cynics ' Club 



ELIZABETH LINDSAY BILLINGSLEY 

Lignum, Virginia 

"Bill" 

There is a young lady called BUI; 

There 's a rumor she sometimes keeps still ; 

Her eyes sjjarkle with fun 

When some mischief is done 
And she talks like a run-away mill. 

Cynic 's Club 

Anti-Crush Club 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society 

Better-to-Sew My Dear Club ' 

Eifle Club 

Nightingale Club. 




^ 



LOTTIE LEE BEOADDUS 

Smoots, Virginia 

"Lot" 

From Caroline comes Lottie Lee; 
At basketball, clever is she; 

She has not much to say; 

Yet her smile day by day 
Wins new friends for our dear Lottie Lee. 

President Athletic AsFOciatiou 

President Caroline Club 

Captain Basketball Teim, 1911-12 

Chairman Inter-Collegiate Committee Y. W. C. A. 

Anti-Crush Club 

Post Walking Club 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



MATTIE HOGGE BUNKLEY 
Tampico, Virginia 

"Bat" 

There is a young widow called Mattie; 
Slie's neither too thin nor to fatty; 

Down the bill she will go 

With the rest in a row, 
Looking always so neat and so natty. 

y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 





MARY ELIZABETH CHESLEY 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

There is a young lady named Mary, 
Not the one who was very contrary; 

For this Mary is dear; 

She is full of good cheer. 
And she warbles just like a canary. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Dramatic Club 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society 

Eifle Club 



ALICE CHILTON 4> 

Lancaster, Virginia 

A student from Lancaster came; 
Sweet Alice may well be her name; 

A vision we hold — 

She '11 not teach till she 's old ; 
Some knight will come urging his claim. 

Secretary- Treasurer Class, 1911-12 
Treasurer Class, 1912-13 

President Russell Literary Society, 1911-12-1: 
President Tennis Club 
Vice-President Dramatic Club, 1912-13 
Secretary-Treasurer Down The River Club 
Secretary-Treasurer ' ' Happy Dozen ' ' 
Secretary-Treasurer Glee Club, 1911-12 
Duke of House of Lancaster 
Cotillion Club 




21 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




ELSIE COLEMAN 
Chase City, Virginia 

There is a young lady, not small, 
Whose one wish is to play basketball. 
She has many a crush, 
Who all talk so much slush 
That our'Elsie is pleased with it all. 

President Anti-Crush Club, 1912-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Tennis Club, 1912-13 

Cotillion Club, 1912-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 

Class Poet 

Poetry Editor The BATTLEriELD 

Rifle Club, 1912-13 



HELEN LANE DANIEL 11 2 
University, Virginia 
"HcU'ii I>" 
Pair Helen is brimming with fun. 
At school a great feat she has done; 
For in Latin 'tis said 
She remained at the head 
Of a class which consisted of one. 
President Senior Class, 1912-13 
Prophet Senior Class 

President Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 
1911-12-13 

Vice-President Y. W. C. A. and Chairman Mem- 
bership Committee, 1912-13 Treasurer 11 2 1912-13 
Secretary Eiohmoud Club, 1911-12 
Chairman Devotional Committee Y. W. C. A., 
1911-12 Glee Club, 1911-12-13 , 

Dramatic Club, 1912-13 Cotillion Club, 1912-13 
Richmond Club, 1912-13 Rifle Club, 1912-13 
Delegate to State Y. W. C. A. Convention at 
Lynchburg, 1912 





ANNA ELIZABETH DIEDRICH 
Waverly, Virginia 

From Waverly, Anna, dear lass, 
Came here with her face for her pass. 

There 's not one so bright. 

When the lessons are light. 
As Anna, the wit of the class. 

Class Editor The Battlefield 

Dramatic Club, 1912-13 

Cotillion Club, 1912-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



OEA CONSTANCE GREEN 
Atlee, Virginia 

"Miss Ora" 

There is a young lady, eighteen, 
Who never once idling is seen. 

Whenever you look, 

She is deep in a book; 
But she, evQn then, is quite Green. 

Secretary Class, 1912-13 

Leader Green Walking Club, 1912-13 

Finance Committee Y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 

Secretary Hanover Club, 1912-13 

Russell Literary Society, 1911-12-13 






ANNE KAVENEL HENRY 11 2 
Woodville, Virginia 

"Nell" 

There is a young lady named Anne; 
Whenever she wants to, she can. 

Since her face one might paint 

As madonna or saint. 
One might get a wrong idea of Anne. 

President Cotillion Club, 1912-13 
Secretary 11 2 1912-13 
Better-to-Sew My Dear Club, 1912-13 
Rifle Club, 1912-13 



JULIA WESTWOOD KEATON 
Hampton, Virginia 



' ' Jute, ' 



'Sis' 



Miss Keaton, who's likewise called .Julia, 
Is not at all queer and ' ' jieculiah ; ' ' 

Though not of great size. 

She has very bright eyes; 
In a contest of wits, she might "fool yeh.'' 

Art Editor The Battlefield 
Devotional Committee Y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 
Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 
Nightingale Club, 1912-13 




THE BATTLEFIELD 




FANNIE TYKEE KENNEDY 
Mineral, Virginia 

A gifted young "school marm " is Fannie 
As to arts she is master of niiiny. 

She can sing like a lark ; 

She can draw in the dark ; 
And can cook and can sew, can Fannie. 

Y. W. C. A., 1911-1912 
Glee Club, 1911-1912 
Double Quartette, 1911-1912 
Rifle flub, 1912-1913 



LUCY KENNEDY 

Mineral, Virginia 

"Elsie" "L. C." 

'Tis Lucy, whose face is as sweet 
As her dress is all dainty and neat, 
•In the Glee Cluo she sings. 
And, among other things. 
She makes candy that cannot be beat. 

Glee Club, 1911-1912 
Y. W. C. A.. 1911-1912 





RUTH HELEN LORD 
Richmond, Virginia 

' ' Peggy ' ' 

Our favorite singer is Ruth, 
Beloved for her sweetness and truth; 

To her work she will hurry 

Eight away in a flurry. 
I tell you it 's hard to catch Ruth. 

Class Historian 

Secretary Glee Club, 1912-1913 
Treasurer Y. W. C. A., 1912-1913 
Treasurer Richmond Club, 1912-1913 
Business Manager Dramatic Club, 1912-1913 
Chairman Finance Committee Y. W. C. A., 1912 
1913 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1912-1913 



24 



T H E 



BATTLEFIELD 



BUFOED KIRTLEY LSTNE 

Newport News, Virginia 

"Boo" "Iley" "Meander" " Coutee" 

There is a young lady named Lyne; 
In music tbey say she is fine. 

Oh, how she can sing 

Like a bird in the spring, 
This skilful young teacher named Lyne. 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief The Battlefield 
Vice-President Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 
1911-12-13 

Secretary Dramatic Club, 1911-12-13 

Representative Cynics' Club 

luter-Collegiate Committee Y. W. C. A., *911-12 

Religious Meetings Committee Y. W. C. A., 1912-13 

Nightingale Club, 1912-13 

Anti-Crush Club, 1912-13 

Cotillion Club, 1912-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Better-to-Sew My Dear Club, 1912-13 

Senior Class Basketball Team, 1911-12 





NETTIE CORBIN MARYE 
Fredericksturg, Virginia 

Our Nettie, who lives iu the city, 
Never needs, upon that account, pity. 

Though she tears out to school, 

She arrives looking cool. 
With a color both rosy and pretty. 



ANNIE FONTAINE NICHOLAS 
Scottsville, Virginia 

With Margaret goes sister Annie, 

Who would have rhymed better with Fannie. 

She 's so buried in books 

That quite often it looks 
As if folks didn 't interest Annie. 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 
Y. W. C. A., 1912-13 
Treasurer Y. W. C. A., 1911-12 




THE BATTLEFIELD 




MARGARET MICOU NICHOLAS 
Scottsville, Virginia 

"Sidy" 

Is it wrong to call Margaret ' ' Nick ' ' 
When tlie editor says, ' ' Now, be quick ' ' ? 

Not the old Nick, we mean. 

That is plain to be seen. 
We can rhyme her with sick or with kick. 

Chairman Missionary Committee Y. W. C. A. 
1911-12 

Chairman Religious Meetings Committee Y. W. C. A. 
1912-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 



SALLY HENRIETTE NORRIS 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

With flying feet comes merry Sally; 
Her clocks and our clocks do not tally. 

It oft seems her fate 

To reach a class late; 
Do you think that, perhaps, she maj' dally? 

Glee Club, 1912-13 





MARTHA BELLE PEARCE 

Richmond, Virginia 

" Biij Abby" "Pete" "Cyclops" 

The chief of the staff is called Belle; 
Her worries no mortal can tell. 

Though she frets o 'er the ' ' stuff, ' ' 

There 's no sign of a huff 
From the one who is always a Belle. 

Editor-in-Chief I'HE Battlefield 
President Richmond Club, 1911-12-13 
Business Manager Dramatic Club, 1911-12 
Dramatic Club, 1912-13 

Secretary Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 
1911-12-13 

Cynic's Club, 1912-13 

Membership Committee Y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



ELLEN PAULINE PERRY 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 

' ' Polly ' ' 

There is a young lady named Perry 
Who always seems happy and merry, 

When it comes to her books, 

One can tell by her looks, 
She's as clever and bright as she's cheery. 

Secretary Eussell Literary Society, 1911-12-13 





JULLA. ANNA RAIFORD 
Ivor, Virginia 

I know a young lady, a Quaker, 
And nothing else you could make her; 

You'll think it peculiar 

When I tell you it's Julia. 
For anything else you might take her. 

Vice-President Y. W. C. A., 1911-12 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Double Quartette, a911-12-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 



VERNA LAURIE ROOKS 
Cheriton, Virginia 

" Hoolsie" 

One maid, fair and sweet, is named Rooks; 
.She may not be too fond of her books; 

But the first year Field Day 

Saw her Queen of the May, 
And she is a real queen in her looks. 

Cotillion Club, 1912-13 
Glee Club, 1911-12-13 
Senior Basketball Team, 1912-13 




27 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




BERTHA LUMBAKD SCRIMGER 
Sharps, Virginia 



This maiden would like to be tall, 
Tho no one else finds her too small; 

She is fond of her books 

And is gooti as she looks. 
Svirely, Bertha is loved by us all. 

Woodrow Wilson Literary, 1911-12-1.3 
Down the River Club, 1912-13 
Nightingale Club, 1912-13 
Membership Committee Y. W. C. A., 1912-13 



ETHEL LOUISE TAYLOR 

Newport News, Virginia 
"Fat," " l!u mplc-'<1 il.<<lin,' ' ' ' Puddie ' ' 
Ethel Taylor, they say, is ambitious. 
If it 's true, may her fate be propitious. 

Ill a play she sho^^'s art, 

For in one she took part 
As a gryphon who looked very vicious. 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief The Battlefield 
President Glee Club, 1912-13 
President Dramatic Club, 1912-13 
Treasurer Cotillion Club, 1912-13 
Treasurer Dramatic Club, 1911-12 
Chairman Bible Study Committee Y. W. C. A., 
1912-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12 Cynics' Club, 1912-13 

Better-to-Sew My Dear Club, 1912-13 

Krokay Klub, 1912-13 Anti-Crush Club, 1912-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 

Bible Study Committee Y. W. C. A., 1911-12 

Basketball Team, 1911-12-13 





ELIZABETH DOROTHY TRIBLE 

Dunnsville, Virginia 

' ' Betsy ' ' 

Here comes Betsy, the dear little lass; 
She's the prettiest girl in her class; 

She can dance like a fairy. 

But she 's not a bit airy. 
Nor fond of her own looking-glass. 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

"Happy Dozen, "1912-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Krokay Klub, 1912-13 

Russell Literary Society, 1911-12-13 

Cotillion Club, 1912-13. 

Mother Goose Club, 1912-13 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



WINNIE DAVIS WALKER 11 2 
Urbanna, Virginia 

"Dec" 

There is a young lady called ' ' Dee ; ' ' 
The girls think few so pretty as she. 

O 'er the floor she can glide 

Like a fair stately bride. 
' ' May ' ' no harm ever ' ' Hurt ' ' our sweet ' ' Dee. ' ' 

Secretary-Treasurer Russell Literary Society,1911- 
12-13 

Secretary Cotillion Club, 1912-13 

Secretary-Treasurer Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Down the River Club, 1912-13 

"Happy Dozen," 1912-13 

Pi Sigma 

Rifle Club, 1912-13 





ANNE LATANE WARE <I> 
Ware's Wliarf, Virginia 

Anne Latane 's also named Ware; 
Her complexion is creamy and fair. 

She teaches so well 

That her praise we must tell; 
And she has the most lovely red hair. 

Treasurer Dramatic Club, 1912-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Quartette. 1911-12-13 

Trio, 1912-13 

"Hqjipy Dozen," 1912-13 

Russ(^rLiterary Society, 1911-12-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 



VIRGINIA ISABEL WILLIS 
Lignum, Virginia 

' 'Sam'' 
Isabel is more often called "Sam;" 
You'd think her as meek as a lamb; 

But this is not right, 

For often by night 
Are heard shrieks from the meek, little ' ' Sam. ' 

Wit Editor The Battlefield 

Class Basketball Team, 1911-12-13 

President Red Headed Club, 1912-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12-13 

Y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Dramatic Club, 1911-12-13 

Cotillion Club. 1912-13 

Better-to-Sew My Dear Club, 1912-13 

Rifle Club, 1912-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Cynics' Club 

29 




l^fcL^ 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




GAY VAUGHAN WILSON 
Richmond, Virginia 

" Gaybell," "Little Wilson," "Jeff" 

There is a young lady called Gay; 

No matter how busy the day, 
She always finds leisure 
And thinks it a pleasure 

To work for Y. W. C. A. 

Business Manager, The Battlefield 

President Y. W. C. A., 1911-12-13 

Vice-President Class, 1911-12 

Dramatic Club, 1911-12-13 

Glee Club, 1911-12-13 

Double Quartette, 1911-12-13 

Censor Eichmond Club, 1911-12 

Eichmond Club, 1912-13 

Woodrow Wilson Literary Society, 1911-12 



MARY ISABELLA WORTHAM 
Chase City, Virginia 

"Angel," " Bcllum," "Little Aihy" 

Last in order comes Isabel Wortham. 

She has friends — I could help you unearth 'em, 

Who are fond of her ways 

And are warm in her praise — 
I assure j'ou that she is well worth 'em. 



Treasurer Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Treasurer Woodrow Wilson Literary 

1911-12-13 

Leader Nighting&les, 1912-13 

Dramatic Club, 1912-13 

Tennis Club, 1911-12-13 

Cynics' Club, 1912-13 

Anti-Crush Club, 1912-13 

Better-to-Sew My Dear Club, 1912-13 

Krokay Klub, 1912-13 



Society, 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



School History 

Away on a hill from the city surrounding us 
That it might not hear all our racket and fuss, 

There sprang into prominence, as if bj' might, 
Our noble school, may it climb to Fame 's height. 




N a bright and glorious day toward the close of September, 
nineteen hundred eleven, the doors of our Normal school 
swung open to receive — what? Girls, who had left their 
homes in this and other states, to come here, with the 
purpose of gaining a little more of the world's knowl- 
edge. 

We would not mention the tears shed the tirst weeks ; 
for had they continued, we are afraid we would have 
been washed away and not one of us would have been 
left to tell the tale. But such things soon passed, and 
bright and smiling faces were soon to be seen here and 
there, and laughter and merriment began to ring through 
the halls. 

As we had, as soon as might be, to furl on high our colors, naturally the 
question was raised, "What shall our colors be?" We looked about us and 
beheld the rich orange and brown of the autumn leaves. The beautiful blue 
of the sky and green of the cedar on which our eyes rested daily, gave a lovely 
inspiration. Other color combinations were suggested and the rooms were 
trimmed with the colors, that we might gaze on their beauty and thus determine 
their value. On the day of the election we assembled en masse to make our 
choice. Ballot after ballot was cast, each time making one less for the final 
struggle. Finally a mighty cheer arose as the blue and green stood alone. 
Now and evermore our pins shall carry our colors and a cheer shall be given 
when our eyes behold the two together. They mean twice as much to us who 
took part on that memorable day in the selection of the Fredericksburg Normal 
colors. 

On October thirty-first, nineteen eleven, strange and mysterious sights 
were seen; for ghosts put in their appearance. I fear the school itself would 
have liked to have a voice and speak. Her lights went out at one time and only 
by the tiny candle's ray were we able to partake of supper. Later strange 
looking people walked around the campus and through the building. Did any 
stay up until midnight to know whether ' ' Fate ' ' would be kind to them or not ? 
We are not prepared to say — what do you think? 

On the last Thursday of November as is alwajs the custom, we had a 
welcome holiday. Some decided they did not wish to keep company with us 
and so sped to their homes : but a fine time was in store for those who remained. 

31 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



As the clock struck six, a gay crowd entered the dining room to enjoy a delicious 
dinner. Afterwards there was music to wMle away the time. 

One evening the ' ' to-be Seniors, ' ' tired of a Friday night with nothing to 
do, had as their guests the Faculty. 

The eleventh month, of the year nineteen eleven, witnessed the birth of 
the Young Woman's Christian Association. 

It was not long before the girls had in view some happy days to be, for 
Christmas was approaching. Such smiling faces were never before seen, and by 
the twentieth of December, this building felt rather lonesome. 

The New Year came in and on the second we tried to settle down to 
studies. How far we succeeded is unknown. 

Then came a winter the like of which we had not seen for years. The 
Rappahannock was frozen over, and gay skating parties had merry times on the 
ice. There was plenty of coasting and sleighing and such winter sports as are 
not possible very often. 

Finally came a night when the F'aculty saw themselves as the students 
saw them. The instructors laughed good naturedly as they saw themselves 
appear. 

Very soon the days of Commencement drew near — we spent one evening 
with the Masters of Art and of Music, feasting our eyes on pictures which could 
almost speak and listening to beautiful melodies. On Sunday, June ninth. Dr. 
James from Richmond preached the baccalaureate sermon, and on the next 
evening, seven students received certificates amid enthusiasm and flowers. 
Then came the time when there must be a parting. Glancing back, the first 
year of our Normal brings pleasant memories which we only hope M'ill be 
increased in numljer as the years roll on. 

Ruth Helen Lord. 

A School Song 

Tune : The Orange and the Black. 

When the stealthy darkness gathers The mighty lamp of knowledge 

And all the ways are dim. Can turn error's night to day; 

Across the misty valley The lamps of faith and courage 

There cometh unto him Drive fear's dark clouds away; 

Who in the shadows walketh. Purity and truth and goodness 

A radiance, clear and bright. Shine amid sin 's blackest night. 

Whence, cheer and comfort giving. May each girl who leaves us carry, 

Shineth forth our Normal light. As she goes, such blessed light. 




Class Prophecy 

Hear ye the words of the prophet! 

I drank of the waters of forgetfulness, and gazing into the crystal, 
beheld the fate of many people. 

A city, teeming with its millions, spread before me on every side evidences 
of happiness and prosperity. Such had been the case since the end of the 
revolution when Gay Wilson was inaugurated President of the United States. 
With the aid of her cabinet she restored order and was now bringing about a 
Utopian condition unequalled even during the term, fifteen years before, of 
her noted relative, Woodrow Wilson. Margaret Nicholas occupied the chair 
of Secretary of Indignation Meetings; Ruth Lord, Secretary of Husband 
Regulation ; Ethel Taylor, Director of Day Nurseries ; Helen Daniel, Secretary 
of Parcel Post. Presidentress Wilson had tried to secure for the Cabinet the 
services of K. Bartenstein and L. Broaddus, two of her former classmates ; but 
Miss Bartenstein refused to leave her music by which she had so long been 
swaying the hearts of her countrymen. Miss Broaddus had decided to rest on 
the laurels she had won in the World's Marathon contests. Rumor whispered 
that the honor of laureate of America would be offered to Elsie Coleman, who 
hsd so fittingly celebrated these victories in verse. 

The "Man's Rights Magazine," edited by Buford Lyne, and the "Woman's 
Rights Magazine," edited by Belle Pearce, had so far forgotten their long 
standing feud as to unite in their efforts to place G. Wilson in the presidential 
chair. 

Among the wonderful buildings of this city, one, equipped with all the 
inventions of modern science, was devoted to the care of all Normal school 
students who, worn out by long years of struggling to beat knowledge into dull 
brains, had become dangerously insane or hopelessly melancholy. Sallie Norris 
mercifully cared for these. The institution had been endowed by Verna Rooks, 
whose marriage to a multimillionaire made possible such generosity. 

In another large building I saw a tall and stately lady with beautiful 
complexion and prematurely grey hair, conducting a select school for young 
ladies. It took me some time to recognize her as my old friend, Winnie Walker. 

A sprightly crowd attracted my attention, and looking, I beheld an army 
of modern Amazons prepared for war. General Julia Raiford presented a 
striking appearance at the head of the coliuun, driving a combination aeroplane 
and motorcycle. On one side rode her two adjutants, Fanny and Lucy Kennedy, 
on simpler machines of modern invention. 

33 



T H t: K A T T L K F I E L D 



When the cohunn moved, a very different scene took its place in the 
crystal. I beheld a luxurious room, lighted by the burning logs in an old 
fashioned fire plate. Several healthy and happy children played round a young 
matron whose husband sat near by watching the picture. The center of this 
domestic scene was Nell Henry. In spite of her wonderful success as a teacher 
of first grade, she had been persuaded that teaching was after all not her true 
calling. 

And now I beheld an enormous Woman's University. There I saw 
several familiar faces. Julia Keaton was instructing in art, Bertha Scrimger 
in manual training, and Anne Latane Ware in music. Mrs. Bunkley I saw at 
the head of the great correspondence department, engaged in disseminating 
knowledge throughout the country. Anna Diedricli had proved an efficient 
assistant in this work. 

A perfect scliool system existed in the city which now showed itself in 
the crystal. Superintendent Pauline Perry had put into practice here the 
theories advanced by the noted authorities, B. Y. Tyner and Virginia Stone. 
Her work had been shared for a short time by Annie Nicholas, but the latter had 
married a learned professor and withdrawn from active labor in educational 
lines. 

The perfect sanitary conditions of the school were due to the efforts of 
a noted physician, the husband of Alice Chilton. 

In this same city I saw the Willis orchestra, conducted by Isabel Willis, 
charming multitudes with the latest compositions of Bartenstein. 

Now I learned the sad fate of Elizabeth Billingsley. She had had a 
desperate love affair which turned out badly, and she retired to a convent, 
hoping thus to ease her broken heart and to forget. 

I turned from this unhappy countenance to a far In'igliter one, Ora 
Green, the president of an agricultural college which had made valuable dis- 
coveries for the rural population of the country. 

Contributions in a scientific line had been made by Isabella Wortham, 
who advanced astonishing theories on evolution, and to the religious world by 
Elizabeth Trible, lately entered into the ministry. 

Of interest also in the religious world was the depai'ture from her native 
shore of Nettie Corbin Marye. She was bound to the South Pole to Christianize 
the inhabitants of that continent so recently discovered. 

A peculiar object appeared in the crystal. It was the latest model of 
Eero-submarine. Marj^ Chesley in appropriate costume was about to mount 
this machine wlien with a loud explosion the crystal burst into a thousand 
pieces. Helen Lane Daniel. 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



Class of 1914 



Motto :The gates are ours to open 



Colors : Orange and Brown 



Flower : Brown-eyed Susan 

Class Officers 

JUNIA GRAVES President 

SUE WALKER Vice-President 

NELL FORD Secretary 

MYRTIS TANKARD Treasurer 

GRAPIAM MASTIN Class Editor 

AGNES JAMES Historian 



Class Roll 



Mary Ella Aeree 
Carrie Maxwell Acree 
Beatrice Louise Ashley 
Iva Celeste Beachboard 
Angle Haig Bray 
Isla Catherine Brizendine 
Lucile Lj'ell Broun 
Lois Nita Burroughs 
Mary Lindsay Carey 
Ruth Elmore Clarkson 
Belle Pollard Curlis 
Azele Curtis 
Jessie Gatewood Daffan 
Mary Christine Deierhoi 
Mary Waggener Donnally 
Alice Leah Finney 
Martha Pollard Fleet 
Nell Broughton Ford 
Helen Campbell Gardener 
Jane Little Garth 
Junia Graves 
Jean Fisher Graves 
Flora McFaden Hill 
Ella Garnett Hoskins 
Agnes Christian James 



Mary Warner Johnson 
Frances Marian Jones 
Emma Woodson Laukford 
Julia Louise Lewis 
Mary Graham Mastin 
Ethel Nash 
Pawling Nelms 
Nannie Cunningham Oliver 
Nannie Waller Parker 
Rachel Ray Pearce 
Lelia Mae Perrin 
Helen Cabell Phillips 
Ruth Anita Post 
Katheryne Gresham Rice 
Lucy Gray Richardson 
Sallye Roberts 
Annie Louise Scott 
Kathleen Holt Scott 
Sarah Temple Segar 
Mary Selden Snead 
Myrtis Garrison Tankard 
Eloise Heath Towill 
Clara Louise von Hofsten 
Susan Dabney Walker 
Catherine Elizabeth Ware 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Class of 1915 

Motto : "Not failure, but low aim is crime." Colors: Green and White 

Class Song: "How Can I Leave Thee?" Flower: White Rose. 

Class Officers 

MAUDE SEAY President 

JOYCE BRADFORD Vice-President 

LOUISE BURKE Secretary-Treasurer 

ALMA RAIFORD Athletic Representative 

ELIZABETH CHENERY Class Editor 

MURIEL BARBER Historian 

Class Roll 
Muriel Barber Alma Raiford 

Joyce Bradford Charlotte Rice 

Soph Brooking Elizabeth Smith 

Louise Burke Sarah Burke Spindle 

Elizabeth Chenery ilaude Seay 

Mary Temple Coleman 

39 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Motto : Excelsior. 



Class of 1916 



Colors : Gold and White. 



Flower : Daisy. 



Class Officers 

EUTH CARTER President 

GRACE EDWARDS Vice-President 

ANNE HARRIS Secretary 

ETTA DAVIS Treasurer 

ELIZA PEIRCE Editor 

NELL HOLLADAY Historian 



Class Roll 



Edna Arnold 
Leah Arnold 
Grace Beazley 
Virginia Bolen 
Virginia Boxley 
Ettinette Broaddns 
Nannie Page Bnrrus 
Ruth Carter 
Ula Cluverius 
Mary Lin Coleman 
Jennie Cowell 
Etta Davis 
Addie Duff 
Grace Edwards 
Merle Garrett 
Elizabeth Gordon 



Lilian Haislip 
Arnie Harris 
Louise Henley 
Nell Holladay 
Mae Hurt 
Waverley Lawson 
Belle Liuthicum 
Helen Munro 
Clara Morgan 
Eliza Peiree 
Jane Pitts 
Ethel Robinson 
Virginia Saunders 
Bertha Scott 
Sex Smith 




FIRST YEAR 

UIMKNOryN PERIL 5 /\VyAITTh[M!!! 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Class of 1917 



Motto : Prosperity is our watchword. Colors: Lavender aud White. 

Flower : Violet. 

Officers 

RUTH WICKHAM President 

COLUMBIA BORUM Vice-President 

EMMA LAWLESS Secretary 

EARLE CARTER Treasurer 

EMMA LAWLESS Class Editor 



Class Boll 



Mary Andrews 
Lelia Babcock 
Callie Bailey 
Abbie. Ballard 
Effie Ballard 
Lueile Boggs 
Columljia Boruni 
Earle Carter 
Lemira Carter 
Bertie Cralle 
Virginia Parinholt 
Janetta Fitzhugh 
Annie Poster 
Marion Harris 
Ora Harris 
Lena Hicks 
Genevieve Jenkins 
Bessie Jesse 



Mary Kendall 
Emma Lawless 
Lillie Lee Miehie 
Mary Moncure 
Ada Nash 
Hannah Pyke 
Nita Pyke 
Margaret Reamy 
Pattie Lee Richards 
Moody Schools 
Lois Shuman 
Ethel Smith 
Marion Sonthall 
Josephine Spindle 
Rnth Thomas 
Lillian Waring 
Rutli Wiekham 
Russell Yowell 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Class of 1918 

Motto : ' ' We are ever striving for the highest. ' ' 
Colors : Gold and Black. Flower: Black Eyed Susan. 

Yell 
Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 
Who are we ? 
We're the Preps, 
Of 19, 1 and 3. 

LAURA SMITH President 

LOUISE COSBY Vice-President 

LUCY PAYNE Secretary-Treasurer 

VIRGINIA GORDON Athletic Representative 

ETHEL BULLOCK Class Editor 

Class Roll 

Elsie Broaddus Rnliy Paulconer Pearl Lucas 

Ethel Bullock Lula French Fannie Nance 

Rosa Burruss ' Virginia Gordon Lucy Payne 

Louise Cosby Mary Griffin Laura Smith 

45 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




The Kindness Man 

HE Are burned low in the grate ; a tiny flicker now and then 
showed still a faint attempt to keep alive. The room was very 
cjuiet, and only the fitful breathing of the sick man broke the 
stillness. 

A woman with wide, sleepless eyes sat by the bed, a 
woman whose hair was sprinkled with gray, and whose hands 
were roughened with toil. It was his mother. 

By and bj' a nurse, immaculate in white cap and uni- 
form, came to the door and looked in, and as silently withdrew. 

The night passed slowly ; the doctor came and went, and then came again, 
for this night would decide whether the man would live or die. 

Towards morning the nurse came on duty, and the woman rose and left 
the room. Outside, under the quiet stars, she fought her battle. The doctors 
had said that if her son lived, his mind would be a wreck, and that he would 
remember nothing of his previous life. There, beneath the stars, which were 
looking down so brightly through the leafless trees, his mother prayed that God 
would take his life. Then she caught her breath with a dry sob; could she 
endure it, her first born, her only son? 

"No!" she cried, "Oh, God, save my boy." 

As she entered the room, the ashes in the grate fell together with a dull 
thud. The sound seemed to arouse the man, for he stirred uneasily, opened his 
eyes, and then turned over and fell into a natural sleep. 
' ' He will live, ' ' the doctor said briefly. 



He was pronounced quite harmless, and after a while people became 
accustomed to seeing him upon their streets. The children even, forgot to run 
when lie appeared, and ceased to fear the eyes which looked at them so kindly. 

Poor fellow ! It was as the doctors had said, and not even the memory 
of his name was left. At first he inquired often what it was, but when they 
told him, he always shook his head sadly, and said : 

' ' No, that is not right. I never heard that name before. ' ' 

One day when he came home, he seemed strangely stirred. It was as if 
some revelation had been given him. 

' ' I know my name at last, ' ' he said quietly, with shining eyes. But when 
his mother questioned him, nothing could induce him to tell what it was, only 
that it was not the name which she tried to call him. 

When he passed a group of children playing in the street, his hand was 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



raised, as in benediction, and when people saw it they felt a touch of awe at his 
simple manner and uplifted face. 

From that time on he was possessed with a strange fancy ; he seemed to 
have almost a mania for performing any service which he deemed helpful to 
man or beast. His face came to have a high, exalted look, and a few of the 
more thoughtful folk of the village wondered sometimes whom he was personify- 
ing, for he never asked his name nowadays ; or told it either, for that matter, 
for when money was offered him in return for the help he gave, a troubled look 
would cross his face, as he replied quickly : 

"No, no, I cannot take it. I do it because I . " And that was as far 

as he ever got, and no amount of questioning ever drew from him anything 
further. 

The place he called home became the refuge for all the stray or afflicted 
animals of the neighborhood. By and by, the children gave him a beautiful 

name. They called him "The Kindness Man," and somehow it stuck to him. 

****** 

Years passed away, and his was still a familiar figure in the streets of 
the town. The little woman who was his mother, had long since become only 
a memory. The hair about his temples was white now, and his form not so 
erect as of old. 

A new generation of children loved their Kindness Man in these days, 
and a new set of strays and waifs shared his quarters. These were his friends. 

And then there came a day when the village was in great peril, and 
through what seemed a miracle, it was the hand of the Kindness Man which 
saved them from the danger. 

As he lay there in the moonlight with upturned face, when they found 
him, one hand was raised as in benediction, and while they crowded weeping 
around his torn and mangled body, a dog slipped through the crowd and licked 
his cold face. 

They laid him to rest in the quiet cemetery by the lake, and the hemlocks 
which waved over him, seemed to whisper in their branches: 

"The Kindness Man; the Kindness Man." 

That night a little girl said to her mother : 

"I wonder who he thought he was." And her mother answered: 

"We will never know." But the pines and the hemlocks murmured 
softly : 

"We know, we know," and bent very low, as if they too, loved the 
Kindness Man. 

JuNiA Graves. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



One of Jack Porter's Escapes 

It was in the very hottest part of the war. The Northern soldiers passed 
back and forth continually by the little cottage in which Mrs. Porter lived. 
There was a full Northern regiment encamped near bj^ which was trying to iind 
the whereabouts of the Southern troops, but had so far tried in vain. They 
had found out, however, that Mrs. Porter was very ill and that she was the 
mother of Jack Porter, the most valuable and daring scout that Longstreet had. 
They also had an idea that Longstreet was somewhere within a radius of ten 
miles but could discover nothing more. So they kept secret but intent watch 
on the little white cottage day and night. 

It was now Monday evening and Mrs. Porter had sent for her son on 
Saturday, almost wishing he would not come, and yet longing to see him and 
know that all was well. The evening wore into twilight, and twilight into 
night and night had worn into morning when Jack appeared. 

He, of course, could only stay one hour and even then the danger was 
trebled every minute. In his anxiety about his mother's condition, Jack had 
almost forgotten that the Federals were the nearest neighbors, and that he sus- 
pected they were watching for him. He was almost deciding that he would 
stay half an hour longer, when the maid, Lucy, came rushing up declaring that 
the yard was full of "Yankee" soldiers and that an officer was talking to old 
Aunt Liza on the porch. 

Then Aunt Liza came up in a terrible state of agitation, saying that the 
officer had found out that Jack was in the house ; that he would give him a 
quarter of an hour in which to give himself up, as he did not wish to search the 
house in consideration of Mrs. Porter's condition; but that after that time had 
elapsed the house would be searched from garret to cellar. 

There was certainly not a moment to lose, because, in spite of Aunt Liza's 
protestations, that young marster hadn't never been there, the officer was sure 
of his game and was determined to carry out his search. Of course, there was 
no place in which Jack could hide in such a small house and no hope of help 
from the comrades so nearby, as they were greatly inferior in number to the 
Federals. If he could not get off from the house inside of fifteen minutes, there 
was nothing ahead of him but the gallows. But Jack wasn't to be so easily 
stumped by a big bunch of Yankees whom he had been perplexing for a good 
while, and who didn't know anything about how to catch a smart Rebel. So 
the first thing Aunt Liza knew, she was stuffing "young marster" out with 
pillows, blacking his face and dressing him in her own clothes. 

It was all done inside of ten minutes and Jack, bonneted and remodeled 
after the image of Aunt Liza, was downstairs with the water bucket going to 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



the spring through the dim morning light, as the good old mammy always did 
before getting breakfast. 

When the Federal officer made his search, naturally it was in vain and 
he had to go away unsuccessful. As the real mammy went to the spring really 
to get water, she said, "Thank de Lawd, I goes to de spring 'bout dis time 
ebery mawnin. " 

Nell Holladay. 



"The Rising Bell" 

Come, children, listen to my song. 

This is the tale I have to tell ; 
It 's all about an awful wrong 

We 've suffered from the rising bell. 

There is a sound at break of day, 

A sound that almost makes us yell; 
Because it drives our dreams away. 

We know it is the rising bell. 

The maid stops just outside each door 

To wake the girls ; she rings it well. 
Until we wish to hear no more 

The peals of that loud rising bell. 

But when the parting time draws near, 

It makes us sad to say farewell. 
To leave the girls now grown so dear. 

And no more hear the rising bell. 

ViEGiNL\ Franklin Bolen. 



51 



< 



cTaBs 



^ 




THE BATTLEFIELD 




THE BATTLEFIELD 




Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 



Mary Acree 
Beatrice Ashley 
Lelia Babcock 
Callie Bailey 
Katharine Bartenstein 
Iva Beachboard 
Grace Beazley 
Lueile Boggs 
Virginia Bolen 
Virginia Boxley 
Joyce Bradford 
Lottie Broaddns 
Soph Brooking 
Lueile Broun 
Mattie H. Bunkley 
Rosa Burruss 
Nannie Page Burruss 
Ruth Carter 
Mary Chesley 
Alice Chilton 
Ruth Clarkson 
Ula Cluverius 
Elsie Coleman 
Bertie Cralle 
Helen Daniel 
Etta Davis 



Mary Deierhoi 
Mary Donually 
Grace Edwards 
Virginia Farinholt 
Alice Finney 
Nell Ford 
Bessie Foster 
Lula French 
Helen Gardiner 
Merle Garrett 
Jane Garth 
Florence Graves 
Jean Graves 
Junia Graves 
Ora Green 
Anne Harris 
Ora Harris 
Louise Henley 
Clara von Hofsten 
Agnes James 



Members 

Ruth Lord 
Buford Lyne 
Graham Mastin 
Helen Monroe 
Louise Motley 
Fanny Nance 
Annie Nicholas 



Sex Smith 
Mary Snead 
Marion Southall 
Myrtis Tankard 
Ethel Taylor 
Elizabeth Trible 
Anne Latane Ware 



Margaret Nicholas Roberta Washington 



Nannie Oliver 
Lucy Payne 
May Payne 
Belle Pearce 
Rachel Pearce 
Eliza Pierce 
Ruth Post 
Alma Raiford 
Julia Raiford 
Margaret Reamy 
Latane Rice 
Maude Seay 



Mary Warner Johnson Moody Schools 



Julia Keaton 
Mary Kendall 
Emma Lankford 
Waverly Lawson 
Louise Lewis 



Lois Shuman 
Bertha Scott 
Kathleen Scott 
Bertha Scrimger 
Sara Temple Segar 



Sue Walker 
Ruth Wickham 
Isabel Willis 
Gay Wilson 
Russell Yowell 
Annie I. Anthony 
Marion C. Forbes 
Cary Graves 
Olive M. Hinman 
Mrs. W. N. Hamlet 
Virginia Stone 
Frances L. Withers 
W. N. Hamlet 
Gunj'on M. Harrison 
E. H. Russell 
Virginia M. Goolrick 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Y. W. C. A. History 



M 



HROUGH the efforts of Miss Gary Graves, we had with us in 
October, 1911, Miss Claris Crane, our Territorial Secretary 
of Y. W. C. A. work. At this time, she presided over a meet- 
ing of the students and faculty of the school, to elect tempo- 
rary officers for the establishment of a Young Woman's 
Christian Association. On November 28th, the Constitution 
of the Y. W. C. A. was drawn up and the permanent officers 
were elected as follows : Gay Wilson, president ; Julia Raiford, vice-president ; 
Marguerite Dowden, secretary ; Annie Nicholas, treasurer. Soon after this, the 
Chairmen and members of the various committees were chosen, and the work 
progressed rapidly from this time. 

Our first participation in the National work of the Y. W. C. A. was the 
observance of the week of Prayer in November ; our first attempt to raise money 
for the carrying on of the work was made by giving a Christmas Bazaar, which 
was very successful ; our first public function was a reception given in January 
to the school. This was largely attended and enjoyed by all. Many other small 
entertainments were given through the year, such as monthly birthday parties 
and a Martha Washington Party. In May, a Mock Faculty Meeting was given, 
to the enjoyment of many, and the proceeds from this went to increase the general 
fund. 

The Sytstematic Giving Plan, which has been carried on very successfully, 
was introduced about this time; the money obtained in this way was donated 
to the cause of home and foreign missions. 

During the winter, our president started the Morning Watch meetings, 
which many of us found to satisfy a long-felt need. Along with this, were 
started three Mission study classes, and Bible classes, one of which was taught 
by a student. 

In March, two of our number were sent as representatives to the State 
Y. W. C. A. Conference at Lynchburg, where they received much encouragement 
and inspiration to bring back to their fellow-workers. In April, a large delega- 
tion of girls attended the Student Volunteer Conference in Richmond — indeed 
our school had the largest representation of any girls ' school there. 

One of the especial objects of our j'car's work, was ralized when we 
obtained one of the nicest rooms in Russell Hall for a Y, W. C. A. room, in 
which to hold our weekly meetings, cabinet meetings and small entertainments. 
We lost no time in furnishing this room with an attractive center table and 
set of chairs, a rug and window curtains, in order to make it a pleasant meeting 
place for the girls during the day. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



In April, the new oiBcers were elected, and plans were made at once 
for the work of the coming year. 

With the opening of school in September, we were all on hand, ready 
and eager to begin, with the hope of making as successful a year in every way as 
was in our power. 

We raised the membership in proportion to the increased number of 
pupils enrolled; we doubled our budget; and established Bible and Mission 
classes, in addition to two Normal training classes, which have been 
very helpful to all who have entered them. We devoted our foreign missionary 
money to Miss Guitna's work in India, and with the home missionary money 
we have established a scholarship in the school, to aid needy girls in obtaining 
an education which they might be unable to secure without help. 

As this year draws to a close, and our term of office expires, we feel that 
we have not done this work to the extent of our ability. We wish that we could 
do it over and do it better ; but as this is impossible, let us remember, as we go 
out into the world to enter a larger field of work, where opportunities are more 
numerous and the need is greater, to take hold of every opportunity as it comes 
to us, and do our best with it, for only in this way can we feel that we have done 
what we could. 

Katii-vrine B.\rtenstein. 



ATHLETICS 




l^.W'CKhAM 



Athletic Association 

Officers 

LOTTIE BROADDUS President 

SEX SMITH Vice-President 

MARY WARNER JOHNSON Secretary 

RUTH CARTER Treasurer 

Members 

Student Body 

Winners of Basketball Monograms 

Myrtis Tankard '14 Ella Garnett Hoskins '14 Lottie Broaddus '13 

Sex Smith '15 Bertha Scott '16 Mary Siiead '14 

Virginia Bolen '16 Sallye Roberts '14 

Lucy Gray Richardson '14 Mary Warner Johnson '14 

Advisorij Committee 
William N. Hamlet Olive M. Hinman Gunyon M. Harrison 

Gary Graves Annie I. Anthony 

Yells Songs 

1. 1. 

Rub-a-d-dub! Tune — Washington and Lee Swing. 

Rub-a-d-dub ! When the S. N. S. girls fall in line, 

Put the other team under the tub They're sure to win a game this very 

Tickle the tub ! time. 

Tickle the tub ! With every throw the ball does make 

Rad— Rah— Rah! a score, 

2 And we shall yell, yell, yell until our 

TTJ! ^ -a ^ jjn, throats are sore, 

Rifety, rifety, raff ! . ^ i n ^ w ^ i 4. ^ i ^ * 

„, .„ ^ , -J, , , _«. , And we shall right, nght, hght lor 
Chiiety, chifety, chaft ! 

Rifety raff, chifety chaff ; every ' 

-r j^, . ^, , , , , What does it matter it the other team 

Let s give them a horse laugh ! 

To the old Varsity team we '11 give this 

3- yell: 

Rah, Rah, green ! Rah, Rah, Rah. 

Rah, Rah, blue ! 2. 

Get there Normal School ! Tune — Down by the Old Mill Stream. 

P. D. Q. Down in the old gym room 

^ Where our school team stands, 

T-, e. -NT o • 1 With a smile on their faces, 

F. S. N. S. IS our cry ! * n , , i, • , • , , 

T,T T ri rn r\ Ty ^^ 1 And the ball m their hands. 

V — 1 — L — 1 — U — ii — 1 — ! 

Watch them how they throw ! 

^- The}' will win we know ! 

Cheer, cheer, chou, chou! But bless your soul 

Bou, bou, High School ! There goes a goal ! 

Sausage ! In the old gym room. 

58 




TROPHSr CUP 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Spring of 1912 

Every one knows that the long fierce struggle in the series of contests was 
between the five regular classes as to which would win the "Trophy Cup." 
The series of contests consisted of the following events : 

Basketball 25 points 

Tennis 25 points 

Field Day Events 50 points 

The field day events included : 



Swimming 

Standing broad jump 
Relay race 
Sack race 



50-yard dash 
Hurdle race 
Potato race 
Three-legged race 
Obstacle Relav Race 



After a hard fight the Third Year Class, having won in Basketball and 
the highest number of points on Field Dav, triumphantly carried off the "Trophy 
Cup." 

60 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Basketball of 1912-13 




HE history of the "Varsity Team" was a struggle with the 
Fredericksburg High School in a series of three games. The 
first game was played November 23, 1912, the score being 
20 to 5, in favor of the Varsity. The level-headed playing 
and quick pass work were the chief characteristics of the 
home team, while the guards on the High School were not to 
lie surpassed. At no stage of the game was the result in 
doubt ; but the plucky sextet from Fredericksburg High School 
showed themselves game to the core. 

The second game was played December 18, 1912, with a score, 14 to 7, in 
favor of Normal School. This game was very brilliant, full of interest and 
tension and excited the admiration of every one. 

Defeat did not seem to affect the Fredericksburg High School rooters, 
for they cheered the defeated team just as long, and just as loudly as if they 
had been victorious. 

The Varsity Team with palpitating hearts and high hopes won the last 
of the series of three games with the Fredericksburg High School which was 
played March 1, 1913. Our very souls thrill now with the recollection of that 
game. The vast crowd watched with breathless and intense silence the play of 
the ball across the courts. At the end of the first half the score was 7 to 4 in 
favor of Varsity. During the second half it seemed that an electric shock 
passed over the plaj'ers. The ball shot like lightning from center into the 
Varsity goal. Not a single field goal was made by the visiting team, but their 
free throws were beautiful to see. The ball passed from center down to the 
Fredericksburg High School goal, but alas! the whistle blew which was like a 
death knell to their hopes, the score being 19 to 4 in favor of the Varsity Team. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Our Varsity Team 




N days of old our warriors bold 
To honors great aspired; 
But iu our day, the maideus play 
For garlands they've admired. 

Upon the field they never yield 
The game that should be theirs ; 

Tho' many fall in basketball, 
For this no athlete cares. 

So, on our team we ever beam, 
And loud their praise we sound, 

' ' The Normal ball will never fall 
While the Varsity Team 's around. ' ' 

Soph Brooking. 




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THE BATTLEFIELD 




Krokay Klub 



Constitution : Every body iiuist play all the time. 

By-Law: No game shall lie played without the presence of Mrs. Chandler. 

Chief Occupation : Knocking. 

Colors: Red, l)lne, green, black, yellow, orange, brown and pink. 

Motto : If at first you don 't succeed, try, try again. 

APPLIED TITLES 

She plays all the time — Mrs. Chandler. 

Chief pusher — Catharine Ware. 

First ass'stant chief pusher — Bertie Cralle. 

' ' Save the wicket ' ' — Mary Gary. 

"Where is my ball?" — Mary Snead. 

She believes in separating partners — Ella Garnett Hoskins. 

Always roving — Bertha Scott. 

Sometimes makes a wicket — Clara Morgan. 

Rail ! Rah ! for Krokay — Olive Hinman. 

Speaks gently in German when she misses a wicket — Eliza Pierce. 

"Don't separate us" — Ethel Taylor and Belle AVortham. 

"Please don't send me away" — Waverly Lawson. 

A sure hitter — Helen Gardiner. 

"Don't send my ball away" — Lucile Brown. 

Never breaks rules — Emma Lankford. 

Never dead on balls — Nannie W. Parker. 

Famous \\ire striker — Fanny Nance. 

"Oh! that's awful" — ITla Cluverins. 

Always over boundary line — Mary L. C^oleman. 

"Roll, old ball" — Lillian Haislip. 

Gives her ball a lift occasionally — Soph Brooking. 

"I can play with one hand" — Betsy Trible. 

"I must become a rover" — Ruth Clarkson. 

"Good eye" — Kathleen Scott. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Walking Clubs 

JUNIA GRAVES '. President 

GRACE EDWARDS Secretary and Treasurer 

MISS GRAVES Honorary Member 

Motto : ' ' Keep a-going ' ' Colors : Road red and grass green 

Flcaver: Running eetlar. 

THE GLOBE TROTTERS THE SPORTS 

SALLYE ROBERTS Leader ' 'LAEA VON HOFSTEN .Leader 

MR. HARRISON Honorary Member MR. HAMLET Honorary Member 

3Jcmhcrs Members 

Angie Bray Sue Wallcer Edna Arnold Genevieve Jenluns 

Agnes James Maude Seay Leah Arnold Mary Kendall 

Joyce Bradford Mary Warner Johnson Lelia Babcock Mae Perriu 

Myrtis Tankard Lillian Haislip Isla Brizendine Pattie Lee Ricdiards 

Jean Graves Eloise Towill Nannie Page Burruss Lucy Grey Richardson 

Nell Ford Mary Deierhoi Belle Curlis Anna Scott 

Nannie Oliver Emma Lankford Helen Gar<liner Marian Southall 

Margaret Reaniy Alice Finney Ora Harris Lillian Waring 

Junia Graves Lena Hicks Lila Williams 




THE GREEN WALKING CLUB 



THE POST WALKING (JLUB 



ORA GREEN Leader 

MISS ANTHONY Honorary Membek 



RTTTH POST Leader 

MISS JACKSON Honorary Member 



Members 



Jlembers 



Ruth Carter 
Earle Carter 
Ruth Thomas 
Jennie Cowell 
Lois Shunian 



Callie Bailey 
Eloise Towill 
Grace Beazlcy 
Moody Schules 
Marian Jones 



Beatrice Ashley 
Lottie Broaddus 
Columbia Borum 
Iva Beachboard 
Bertie C'ralle 
Louise Cosby 



Grace Edwards 
Merle Garrett 
Helen Munro 
Ada Nash 
Jane Pitts 
Ruth Wiekham 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



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Glee Club 

Officers 

ETHEL TAYLOR President 

KATHARL\E DARTENSTEIN Vice-President 

RUTH LORD Secretary 

KATHLEEN SCOTT Treasurer 

MFSS FRASER Director 

KATHARLNE BARTENSTEIN Accompanist 

31 embers 

Mary Aeree Anna Diedrieh Einnia Lawless Maude Seay 

Maxie Acree Mary Deierhoi Ruth Lord Mary Snead 

Beatrice Ashley Grace Edwards Mary Monture Slyrtis Tankard 

Lucille Boggs Alice Finney Ethel Nash Ethel Taylor 

Joyce Bradford Martha Fleet Ada Nash Eloise Towill 

Angle Bray Jane Garth Pawling Nelms Clara, von Hofsten 

Earle Carter Juuia Graves Margaret Nicholas Winnie Walker 

Elizabeth Chenery Jean Graves Nannie Oliver Catherine Ware 

Alice ChiHon Lillian Haislip Julia Raiford Ruth Wiekham 

Elsie Coleman Nell Holladay ^'erna Rooks Isaliel Willis 

Mary Lin Coleman May Hurt Kathleen Scott Gay Wilson 

Helen Daniel Mary Warner Johnson Russell Yowell 

69 




THE NIGHTINGALES 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



The Nightingales 



Aim : To outsing the Glee Club. 

Favorite Song: "We won't go home till morning." 

When we sing best — at midnight. 
BELLE WORTHAM Le.vder 

Members 

Sarah T. Segar, soloist — ' ' Seeing Nellie Home. ' ' 
Helen Phillips — Sings do, ti, do, with great gusto. 
Anne Harris — With a voice so sweet and low. 
Julia Keatou— Whoa Mule ! Wanka ! ! 
Bertha Scrimger — Her voice is like the balililing l)rook. 
Charlotte Rice — Is that a Junco we hear? 
Margaret Reamy — Little, but loud. 
Agnes James — Loo, loo, loo. 

Grand Quartette 

N. W. Parker, baritone, second part. 
Buford Lyne, low soprano, tenor. 
Nell Ford, high l)ass. 
Agnes James, low bass. 

Soloist 
Elizabeth Billingsley — "Love's Old Sweet Song." 

Qi.intette 

Sallie Roberts, mezzo contralto. 
Louise Henley, shrill second tenor. 
Katherine Rice, diminuendo soprano. 
Margaret Reamy, crescendo alto. 
Belle Wortham, bass Ijaritone. 

The twins: Bertha Scott, Ella Garnett Hoskins — "How Can I Leave Thee." 



THE 



BATTLEFIELD 



The Russell Literary Society 



ALICE CHILTON President 

PAULINE PERRY Secretary 

WINNIE WALKER Treasurer 

Members 

Angie Bray Nannie Oliver 

Lueile Brown Nannie Waller Parker 
Virginia Bolen Eliza Pierce 

Joyce Bradford Margaret Reamy 

Ruth Clarkson Kathryne Rice 

Mary Lin Coleman Charlotte Rice 

Mary Deierhoi Sallye Roberts 

Nell Ford Mary Snead 

Alice Finney Bertha Scott 

Martha Fleet . Kathleen Scott 
Ora Green Sarah Temple Segar 

Ella Garnett Hoskins Myrtis Tankard 

Lilian Ilaislip Eloise Towill 

Mary Warren Johnson Elizabeth Trible 

Agnes James Anne Lataue Ware 

Emma Lankford Catharine Ware 

Lonise Lewis Winnie Walker 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Woodrow Wilson Literary Society 

HELEN LANE DANIEL President 

BUFORD KIRTLEY L7NE Vice-President 

MARTHA BELLE PEARCE Secretary 

MARY LSABELLA WORTHAM Treasurer 

Members 



Beatrice Ashley 
Muriel Barber 
Katharine Bartenstein 
Ira Beachboard 
Elizal:)eth Billingsley 
Lottie Broaddiis 
Soph Brooking 
Mattie Bunkley 
Elizabeth Chenery 
Mary Chesley 
Elsie Coleraaii 
Helen Daniel 
Anna Deidrich 
Janetta Pitzhiigh 
Jane Garth 
Jean Graves 
Junia Graves 
Lonise Henlev 



Nell Holladay 
May Hurt 
Julia Keaton 
Emma Lawless 
Buford Lyne 
Ruth Lord 
Mary Moncure 
Ada Nash 
Belle Pearce 
Ruth Post 
-Julia Raiford 
Maude Seay 
Bertha Serimger 
Ethel Taylor 
Winnie Walker 
Ruth Wickham 
Isabel Willis 
Belle Wort ham 



Marion C. Forbes 



Honorary Members 



Virginia M. Goolriek 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Famous American Illustrators 



BEATRICE ASHLEY 
MURIEL BARBER 
IVA BEACHBOARD 
SOPH BROOKING 
MARY DONNALLY 
HELEN DANIEL 
JEAN GRAVES 
CLARA VON HOFSTEN 
OLIVE M. HINMAN 



JULIA KEATON 
H. ROBERT MANZ 
ADA NASH 
NANNIE OLIVER 
NANNIE W. PARKER 
BERTHA SCRIMGER 
WINNIE WALKER 
RUTH WICKHAM 
ELIZABETH WINN 





SORORITIES 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Pi Sigma 



Founded December, 1911 
Colors : Yellow and White. Flower : Daisy 

Sororcs in Vrbc 

JANETTA FITZHUGH 
LAURA McBOWMAN 
MARY GRIFFIN 

MARGUERITE COLBERT 

Sorores 

ELIZABETH CIIENERY 
HELEN DANIEL 
ANNE HENRY 

EMMA LAWLESS 
LILLIE MICHIE 
MARY MONCURE 
HANNAH PYKE 
NITA PYKE 

LAURA SMITH 

WINNIE WALKER 




AGNES JAME, 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Phi 

Founded November 27, 1912 
Colors: Violet aud Green. Flower: Violet. 

Menibei's 
ANGIE BRAY ■ JULIA LOUISE LEWIS 

ALICE CHILTON SALLYE ROBERTS 

MARTHA POLLARD FLEET MYRTIS GARRISON TANKARD 

AGNES CHRISTIAN JAMES ANNE LATANE WARE 



Patronesses 

OLIVE HINMAN FRANCES WITHERS 

VIRGINIA STONE 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Richmond Club 

Motto : ' ' Do, die or bust. ' ' 
Colors : Royal Purple and Gold. 
Flower : Richmond Rose. 
Song : ' ' The Lass of Richmond Hill. ' ' 

Officers 

MARTHA BELLE PEARCE President 

CLARA LOUISE VON HOFSTEN Vice-President 

MARTHA POLLARD FLEET Secretary 

RUTH HELEN LORD Treasurer 



Membe 



Beatrice Louise Ashley 
Calphurnia Anna Bailey 
Ettienette Hoskius Broaddus 
Helen Lane Daniel 
Mary Christine Deierhoi 
Martha Pollard Fleet 
Clara Louise Von Hofsten . 



Bertha May Hurt 
Ruth Helen Lord 
Helen Anna IMunro 
Martha Belle Pearce 
Rachel Ray Pearce 
Gay Vaughan Wilson 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




l\/^^t^tKBo^^^3l 

Dramatic Club 

Motto : ' ' We can because we can. ' ' 

Officers 

ETHEL TAYLOR President 

ALICE CHILTON Vice-President 

BUPORD LYNE Secretary 

ANNE LATANE WARE Treasurer 

KATHARINE BARTENSTEIN Musician 

RUTH LORD Business Manager 

VIRGINIA M. GOOLRICK Sponsor 

GuNYON M. Harrison, Stage Manager. 

Members 

Katharine Bartenstein Louise Lewis 

Laura Bowman Ruth Lord 

Angie Bray Buford Lyne 

Nita Burroughs Belle Pearce 

Mary Chesley Charlotte Rice 

Alice Chilton Ethel Taylor 

Helen Daniel Anne Latane Ware 

Anna Diedrich Ruth Wickham 

Martha Fleet Isabel Willis 

Ella Garnett Hoskins 6a j' Wilson 

Louise Henley Belle Wortham 

Emma Lawless Nannie Oliver 
85 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




"pe-anUETyhLE-l 



Down the River Club 

Motto : "We Paddle Our Own Canoe." Colors: Sea- foam and Sky-blue. 

Flower : Water Lily. 

GRACE EDWARDS President 

LUCILLE BROWN Vice-President 

ALICE CHILTON Secretary and Treasurer 



Members 



Angle Bray 
Lueile Broun 
Nita Burroughs 
Mary L. Carey 
Alice Chilton 
Ruth Clarkson 
Bertie Cralle 
Grace Edwards 
Nell Ford 
Lillian Haislip 
Ella Garnett Hoskins 
Agnes James 
Waverly Lawsoii 
Louise Lewis 



Clara E. Morgan 
Pawling Nelras 
Nannie Oliver 
Nannie W. Parker 
Eliza Pierce . 
Charlotte Rice 
Katliryne Rice 
Kathleen Scott 
Bertha Scrirager 
Sarah Temple Segar 
Elizabeth Smith 
Mary Snead 
Eloise Towill 
EUzabeth Trible 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Caroline Club 

Colors: Green and White. 

Flower: Arbutus. 

Motto : Put off for tomorrow what you can do today. 

Aim : To have the mostest fun in the worstest way. 

Song: .Take Me Bade to Ole Caroline. 

Officeis 

LOTTIE BROADDUS President 

RUTH CARTER Vice-President 

ILA CARTER Secretary 

SEX SMITH Treasurer 

Blerlihers 

Jane Pitts Ethel Smith 

Ruth Thomas Lois Shuiuan 

Earle Carter Lena Hicks 

Honorary Member 
A. B. Chandler, Jr. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Hanover Club 

Motto : ' ' United we stand, divided we fall. ' ' 
Flower : Red Peony. Colors : Red and Green 

Song : "Dat Watermelon Hanging on de Vine." 
Toast: "Here's to the county that we call home, 
The happy days when we used to roam 
Where the melons sweeten in the summer sun. 
And persimmons ripen for winter's fun — 
Here's to Hanover. 

ELIZABETH CHENERY President 

JENNIE COWELL Vice-President 

ORA GREEN Secret .vry axd Treasurer 

Grace Beazley Mae Perrin 

Ada Nash Ruth Wiekham 

Flora Hill 



THE BATTLEFIELD 






House of Lancaster 


vvER: Red Rose. 


Motto : Vineemiis. 


Colors: Red and Green 


e: AGNES JAMES 






Earl: ELIZA PEIRCE 


Count : ALICE CHILTON 




Knights 


- 


Nell Ford 




Nannie Oliver 


Lucile Brouu 


Bessie Jesse 


Louise Lewis 




Eloise To will 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




King and Queen Court 

Colors: Royal Purple and Gold. Flower: Purple Pansy. 

Motto : Always ahead. 

Members 

MAUDE SEAY King 

MERLE GARRETT Queen 

MAXIE AGREE Herald 

MARY TEMPLE COLEMAN Chancellor 

LOUISE BURKE Jester to His Ma.jesty 

MARY AGREE Officer to His Ma.jesty 

MOODY SCHOOLS Executioner to His Ma.jesty 

ULA CLUVERIUS Lady op the Court 

LUCY GRAY RICHARDSON Gentleman of the Court 

91 



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J / 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



Rifle Club 



Names reading from left to right. 

Alma Raiford Louise Henley 

Virginia Bolen May Hurt 

Marian Jones Angle Bray 

Mary Andrews Winnie Walker 

Joyce Bradford Nell Ford 

Mary Lin Coleman Nell Henry 

Maud Seay Rachel Pearce 

Jessie Daifan Virginia Boxley 

Isla Brizendine Ruth Clarkson 

Soph Brooking Agnes James 

Elsie Coleman Sallye Roberts 

Nannie Page Burruss Myrtis Tankard 

Fanny Kennedy Charlotte Rice 

Mary Chesley Sex Smith 

Lucy Gray Rieliardson Virginia Farenholt 

Bertie Cralle Ruth Post 

Anne Harris Ula Cluverius 

Moody Schools Columbia Borum 
Organizer — Gunyon Harrison 

Expert Rifle Women — Nell Henry, Moody Schools, Elsie Coleman. 

Sharpshooters 
Sex Smith Ruth Post 

Bertie Cralle Virginia Boxley 

OBJECT OF THE CLUB 

We make no apology whatever for the existence of oiir club. We have 
already amply disproven the notion that girls can't shoot. If you could just 
see some of our perforated targets with the poor bull's eye shot all to pieces! 

Some ignorant girls and more ignorant boys, may taunt us for handling 
firearms. They are just jealous because they are too timid or too unsteady to 
shoot. But we are the unafraid stutf, and we just love shooting, and shooting 
to hit is too lovely for compare. The open out of doore for us all the time ! 

Our art is as womanly as it is manly. Who knows how protective it may 
prove some day? Besides, it gives us steadiness, and courage, and confidence. 
All right, fellows, whenever you want protection from ghosts or any other old 
visil)le or semi-visible enemy that lives, half lives, thinks or thinks he or she or 
it thinks, or moves, or crawls, or swims, or flies, summon us to the resciie (juick. 
We'll be your saving bodyguard. 

93 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Cynics' Club 



Motto: "Weep and the world weeps with j^ou, 
Laugh and j'ou hmgh alone. 
Flower: Weeping Willow. Colors: Red and Black. 



Cynics 

Katharine Bartenstein 
Elizabeth Billingsley 
Lucille Boggs 
Grace Edwards 
Jean Graves 
Junia Graves 

Thirteenth Memher 

Olive M. Hinman 




Cynics 

Buford Lyne 
Belle Pearce 
Rachel Pearce 
Ethel Taylor 
Isabel Willis 
Isabella Wortham 



Song: Forgotten. 




OOTHCR GU175C C^ffS 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Mother Goose Club 

Geese 

Mother Goose OLIVE HINMAN 

Teeny-Tiny MARY LIN COLEMAN 

Puneh MARY WARNER JOHNSON 

Judy NANNIE WALLER PARKER 

Twcedle-Dum BERTHA SCOTT 

Tweedlc-Dee ELLA GARNETT HOSKINS 

Cross Patch MARY SNEAD 

Goslings 

Ten o'clock scholar ANGIE BRAY 

Jack Sprat '. NELL FORD 

Jack Sprat's wife SARAH TEMPLE SEGAR 

Little Jack Horner LOUISE LEWIS 

Humpty Dumpiy NANNIE OLIVER 

Simple Simon KATHLEEN SCOTT 

Miss Muffet ELOISE TOWILL 

Tom, Tom, the Piper's son BETSY TRIBLE 

Old Mother Hubbard CATHARINE WARE 

Constitution : By-Laws : 

For every evil under the sun 1. A man of words and not of deeds 

There is a remedy, or there is none. Is like a garden full of weeds. 

If there be one, try and find it ; For when the weeds begin to grow. 

If there be none, never mind it. Then doth the garden overflow. 

Article op Membership : 

Speak when you're spoken to. 2. Tit for tat — 

Come ■when you're called. You kill my dog, 

Shut the door after you, I kill your cat. 
And turn to the wall. 

Motto : Needles and pin^, needles and pins. 

When a man marries his trouble begins. 

Colors : Light Blue and White. Mascot : Little Boy Blue. 

Yell : Hot cross buns, Hot cross buns. 

Hot cross buns. Hot cross buns. 

One a penny, two a penny. If you have no daughters 

Hot cross buns. Give them to your sons. 

Song : Polly put the kettle on, Game : Dance, thumpkin, dance. 

And then we'll all have tea. First Swim: February 14, 1913. 



97 







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THE 



BATTLEFIELD 




"The Better-to-Sew, My Dear" Club 



Mascct : ' ' Peter Pan of Brompton. ' ' 

Constitution : Invite Koko Eowe over real often. 

By-Law: Miss Hinman shall serve fudge or chocolate with marshmallows in it, every time 
we meet in her room, under penalty of twenty-five cents fine. 

Codicil: 1. Every member must entertain the club at leatt once during the session. 
2. We will meet once a week, on Saturday afternoon, and so and so and so. 

Postscript: There shall be always a thirteenth member. 

Members 



Katharine Bartenstein 
Isabel Willis 
Buford Lyne 
Anne Harris 
Louise Henley 
Belle Wortham 



Ethel Taylor 
Lueile Boggs 
Bill Billingsley 
Nell Henry 
Myrtis Tankard 



Thirteenth Member 
Olive M. Hinman 



Honorary Member 
Margaret D. Fraser 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Happy Dozen Club 

Motto: Laugh and others will "jine" in. 
P\.owER : Pink Carnation. Colors : Pink and Pea Green. 

EMMA LANKFORD President 

JOYCE BRADFORD Vice-President 

ALICE CHILTON , Secretary-Treasurer 

ANNE LATANE WARE Wit Editor 

Joyce Bradford Grace Edwards 

Angie Bray Kathleen Scott 

Alice Chilton Myrtis Tankard 

Alice Finney Betsy Trible 

Louise Lewis Anne Latane Ware 

Eiunia Lankford Winnie Walker 




THE BATTLEFIELD 




The Red Head Club 

Motto : "Resolved: That we will be shining lights for midnight wayfarers." 

Color : Sage Green. Charm : Rabbit 's foot. 

Flower : White Rose. 

ISABEL WILLIS President 

ANNE LATANE WARE Vice-President 

KATHARINE BARTENSTEIN Secretary-Treasurer 

KOKO ROWE Honorary Member 

Lillian Haislip Lois Shumau 

Laura Smith Mary Deierhoi 

Flora Hill Sue Walker 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Anti-Crush Club 

Mascots 

MARGUERITE CARTER 

WARREN RUSSELL 



Motto : Love everybody, crush noljody. 
Flower : Forget-me-not. 

Crushers 

Sallye Roberts and Rachel Pearce 
Buford Lyne and Mary Donnally 
Ethel Taylor and Isabel Wortham 
Lottie Broaddus and Sex Smith 
Elizabeth Billingsley and Elsie Coleman 



Food: Kisses. 





\ '^^ 



SOCIETY 



THE 



BATTLEFIELD 



Y. W. C. A. Reception 




N Friday evening, Septeniljer 19, 1912, the Young 
Women's Christian Association gave a reception to the 
student Iiody and faculty of tlie school, in honor of the new 
girls. 

In the receiving line were our president and his 
wife, Mr. and Mrs. Russell, Miss Forbes, our lady princi- 
pal, and the officers of the association in order. As the 
long line of girls passed by, a word of greeting and a hand 
of welcome was extended to each. 

A short program of entertainment had been 
arranged for the evening. The tirst number was a tableau of "The Pink 
Lady," represented by a girl gowned in pink and white, and seated in a 
graceful pose, while the "Pink Lady" was sung by a (juartette of girls. 
Another tableau, "A Garden of Roses," showed the faces of a number 
of girls wreathed in roses, wliile the song was rendered as a solo. Several 
entertaining recitations were given, and some songs of the old double quartette. 
After this, the assembly was requested to march around and pass through 
Blue Beard's den before returning to their seats. On arriving in Blue Beard's 
den their faces blanched and their blood turned cold to see the awful Blue 
Beard in person, striding up and down his den as he muttered dreadful threats 
and waved his sword in threatening circles; but most awful of all was the 
spectacle of his unfortunate wives strung to the wall by their hair, while drops 
of blood trickled down their faces. 

After this nerve-straining ordeal, the tension was relaxed by the serving 
of simple refreshments, after which the evening closed with many expressions 
of enjoyment from the guests. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



The Tacky Party 



Great excitement reigned in the dormitory on the evening of October 
the fifth. Garments of the most gorgeous hues were exchanged and donned for 
the great event; faces were painted and masks made. Finally all in their most 
glittering array assembled in Russell Hall. 

The fun began in the proper way by serving delightful refreshments 
K;onsisting of a stick of peppermint candy stuck in a lemon. In two corners of 
the room gypsies had pitched camp. These were presided over by the two 
"belles" of the school, Misses Wortham and Pearce, both of whom told with 
marvelous foresight and power, the unknown future to all who applied. In the 
center of the room a herald beat a dish pan as an invitation to come and, with 
eyes blindfolded, try to pin the girati'e's tail in the proper place. Many 
attempted, some even getting it so close as to pin it on the poor animal's ear 
and nose. Finally the grand parade, the real event of the party, came. The 
faculty sat in state and watched closely to judge who had reached the artistic 
height in tackiness. Truly a hard problem, but after much discussion it was 
decided that Miss Angle Bray should receive the first prize ; Miss Graham 
Mastin, the second, and Miss Ruth Carter, the third. The prizes were awarded by 
Mr. Tyner, and as it had been previously announced that they would be every 
girl's heart's desire, the fortunate ones opened them with eagerness, while the 
others looked on in expectant silence. They proved to be all that was claimed: 
each a man in miniature, the more appreciated because they are so scarce. After 
some dancing the party was over. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



The Hallowe'en Party 

On Hallowe'en night a party was given to the faculty and students by 
the Y. W. C. A. As the lights did not burn, the guests were rather late in 
going to the gym, where the party was given. 

A few girls started out before the lights came on, nevertheless. They 
were met a little distance from the dormitory by a band of witches. At the 
gj'm door they were met by another band. 

When tlie lights appeared the rest of the guests arrived and the party 
began. There was a witches' dance, after which refreshments were served and 
the guests had their fortunes told. 

All then went to the basketball court where two large fires were burning. 
The rest of the evening was spent in toasting marshmallows before these fires. 

Soon the time for departure arrived and the students and faculty went 
away feeling that thej' had spent a very pleasant evening. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Thanksgiving Dinner 

Menu 
OYSTERS ON HALF SHELL 

OYSTEEETTES 

ROAST TURKEY 
CRANBERRY SAUCE 



POTATO AU GRATIN 



ASPARAGUS TIPS ON TOAST 

NEAPOLITAN CREAM 
ASSORTED CAKES 



FRENCH PEAS 



DEMI-TASSE 
NUTS 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Our Maiden Attempt at Entertaining 

The First Professional Class met and decided to have an entertainment — 
principally to show oif the talent and wit of the class, and to make some money 
for the Athletic Association, by the way. It was to excel everything before 
dreamed of in modern history, and it fulfilled its purpose, for, since the days 
of the Ol.ympian games, nothing has held an audience as spell bound. 

There were tableaux — some even moving tableaux — which even up-to-date 
Fredericksburg has not yet attained. The operatic stars reached their climax 
in "Kentucky Babe," for the rendering of that solemn and pathetic symphony 
was in advance of even the twenty-first centur.y. 

If Washington Irving had thought that any of his productions would 
ever be reproduced liy such celebrated actresses he would have had a much 
greater fondness for the fair sex. We were determined to have everything 
new, so lehabod Crane and Brom Bones galloped through "Sleepy Hollow" 
on their bony skeletons — called horses — going to Katrina's. 

Between these marvelous performances, instrumental solos were rendered 
by one of our fair damsels. All the glory and beauty of this occasion belonged 
entirely to us — the First Professionals — except one important feature, and we 
felt that this, too, belonged to us in great part. For the witty speeches of one 
of our most loyal friends tided us over many difficulties, and helped, to a great 
extent, in making our maiden attempt the decided success it was. If any one 
doubts that it was a success, let him ask how nuicli "chink" we took in. 



The Book Party 



The Y. W. C. A. entertained its members with a book party on January 
25, 1913. Among the guests was a lad with his sleeve hanging pathetically 
empty, and his freckled face aglow with health. A lady, gorgeous in dress of 
Japanese fashion, excited much curiosity, while a boy and girl with their bright 
scarfs and (|ueer wooden shoes made one think of far-away Holland. Many 
were decorated with emblems whicli seemed to have a hidden significance. 

What did it mean? 

Each person had been asked to represent a book ; that explained the queer 
costumes and strange decorations which some of the guests wore. "Hans 
Brinker's" devotion to "Gretchen" was understood, while "Freckles" made 
an appeal to our sympathy none the less strong. Especially apt representations 
were made of "Leather Stocking Tales," "The Open Question," and "The 
Moonstone." Much entertainment was afforded by guessing the names of the 
books which were represented. 

The guests were entertained liy music and recitations, and when refresk- 
ments were served and the guests took leave, all agreed that the occasion had 
been one of great pleasure. 

108 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Buns 

On January the twenty-ninth, the First Professional Class was invited 
to eat a bun and have a cup of ehoeolate with Miss Hinman, our honorary mem- 
ber, who always strives for the welfare of our class. The occasion was one to 
bring joy to any school girl's heart, for there were buns and chocolate galore. 
Next to eating, what could give us more pleasure than gossip ! And gossip we 
did. Each girl strove to outdo the other in starting marvelous rumors, which 
created much excitement. At the end of the hour we left, all declaring that 
our honorary member was indeed an honor to our class. 



Jumbled Vegetables 



It was with great delight that the members of Mrs. Chandler's Bible 
Class learned that they were to be rewarded for their faithful ( ? ) efforts by 
being given a party. Their interest and delight were further aroused when it 
was announced that some boys from town were coming, and there would lie 
enough of them to "go 'round." 

That this interest never wavered was shown by the fact tliat every girl 
arrived promptly upon the scene of action, and was received by the hostess in 
that charming manner peculiar to herself. Soon afterwards the boys came and 
the party began. A rather unusual thing for a party now took place — fifteen 
"jump led vegetables" were passed around to each couple. Do not think, how- 
ever, that these vegetables were the refreshments, for the3', and very elegant 
ones they were, came later. These "jumbled vegetables" were on paper, and 
were to be re-arranged and spelled correctly within a certain time. Owing to 
the usual aptitude of the "Normal" girls, plus the noble assistance of their 
partners, eight couples succeeded in writing out all fifteen vegetables correctly. 
Then the girls had to "draw straws," and Miss Catharine Ware drew the win- 
ning straw and landed the much-coveted prize. 

A])out this time we were reminded of the late liour )iy the winking of 
the lights, and tliis most enjoyaltle event ended with fifteen "ralis" from the lioys 
for Mrs. Chandler. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Boys Were There! 



One moment. Did I hear you ask for curling irons? Not since tlie night 
of February 22nd have they been obtainable in the city of Fredericksburg. 
Why? The girls of the Normal have long since bought all in their range. 
Excitement rang through every corridor in the dormitory. In each room could 
be found at least three girls doing a thing quite unusual for Normal School 
girls — "prinking." What was the meaning of all this? The Student Activity 
Committee had planned a reception for the girls. Now that the night and hour 
had arrived it found a gay assemblage of girls, as we would usually say, but not 
so tonight, for boys were there ! ! 

' ' Can this be the auditorium 1 ' ' was the buzz of the entire body of girls. 
It was hard to realize that this beautiful room with its artistic decorations was 
anything other than a Bohemian banquet hall. The entire crowd seemed thrilled 
with joy and excitement. The climax was reached when the guests were invited 
to the dining room, which looked as if it were a Japanese flower garden. All 
kinds of dainties were served. Each person was presented with a cherry, which 
made all participants wish that Washington knew that the tradition of the 
cherrv tree was still alive in the hearts of his countrvmen. 



110 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Dot's Burglar 



■^^■■^■■■■1 ANB RANDOLPH, where on earth have you Ijeen 'I Do you 

ykiiow I've been sitting here, afraid to move, for the last 
half an hour? You may laugh, but, after what I've heard, 
I dared not move from the room." 
"Do calm yourself, Dot, and tell me what has happened," 
Jane answered, slipping an arm around the little figure on 
the low window seat. "You were quietly reading when I 
went out a few minutes ago. Surely nothing very dreadful could have occurred 
in such a short time. ' ' 

"Dreadful? Well, I should say so! Two men are plotting to break into 
this room tonight. 1 overheard them talking right under the window. One of 
the men pointed up here, and I distinctly heard him say 'rope ladder'! Oh! 
Jane, what shall we do? I wish I had never seen this old school! I want to go 
home ; I want to go h-o-m-e ! ' ' she murmured, burying her face in Jane 's con- 
venient lap. 

"Don't cry, Dot," and the older girl smoothed the chestnut curls gently. 
"I hardly think any one would attempt a burglary in this small town. Perhaps 
you misunderstood what the man said." 

Up came the tumbled curls with a jerk. "I heard him say as plainly as 
I hear you, Jane Randolph, but I can't make you realize our danger, and I know 
we are going to be murdered ! ' ' she moaned. 

"Whatever can be the matter with Sis Dot? Does she want to go 
h-o-m-e?" mimicked a laughing voice from the doorway. 

Jane looked up in grief. 

' ' Oh, Lucile, come and see if you can comfort her. She declares she over- 
heard some men plotting to break into the house tonight. Tell her aboiit it. Dot. ' ' 

With much effort, Dot tried to impress upon her roommate the reality of 
their danger. 

' ' You will tell the policeman, won 't you, Lucile ? ' ' she pleaded. 

"What a crazy! Tell the policeman! Not if I know it! This is the 
first chance Lucile Crane has ever had to be a heroine, and she doesn't mean 
to let it slip, either. The police shan't have the glory of this capture, if I can 
help it." 

"But, Lucile," Jane began. 

"Now don't say a word, Jane! You always object to my plans for 
adventure, and, if you interfere this time, I'll never speak to you again! I'm 
going right down town and buy a pistol, ' ' and tlie door slammed after her dis- 
appearing figure. 

The evening shadows had long since deepened into the cold winter's night. 
Not a sound broke the stillness which hung aliout the old gray walls and massive 
pillars of this school, and all of its inmates seemed wrapped in the depths of 

111 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



slumber. A twinkle of light, from an upper window, showed an exception, how- 
ever, and in tliis room three thoroughly frightened girls talked in fearful 
whispers. Two trunks were piled, one above the other, against the window, and 
in front of these stood Lueile Crane, pistol in hand. On the third trunk sat 
Jane, armed with an old andiron, and in the middle of the floor that important 
young lady herself brandishing a broomstick wildly. 

"I shall go crazy with suspense, if this lasts much longer, Jane. I feel 
as if I must scream or do something desperate; 1 just can't stand it another 
minute!" and down went the broomstick, witli a loud clap. 

"Do be quiet. Dot — listen!" 

A sharp grating sound was distinctly heard. 

' ' 0-o-oh ! he 's throwing the rope up ! " ' gasped Dot. ' ' I heard it scrape 
against the house. ' ' 

With this the three girls rushed toward the bed, and six trembling hands 
pushed it against the trunks. In her haste Lueile had dropped the pistol and 
now it was nowhere to be found. 

"That is just like your carelessness, Lueile Crane !" declared Dot. "What 
geese we were to listen to you, anyway ! I 've a mind to go and call Mrs. George, 
right now." 

"All right, old girl, if you can face the job, do it, but Lueile Crane 
means to stay in the background; she doesn't care to be frozen solid to night, 
by icy words rolling down from Her August Majesty : ' Young ladies, I am sur- 
prised at such childish behavior. Of course you heard nothing of the kind. It is 
shameful in you to arouse me at this hour of the night!' No, girls, it won't do; 
we will have to think of some other way out of this difficulty. ' ' 

After roll-call the next morning, Mrs. George arose in her impressive 
manner and tapped the bell for silence. "Girls," she said, "for a long time we 
have thought that our arrangements for your safety, in case of fire, were not 
good, so we have at last decided to provide the girls of each room with a fire 
escape. This afternoon a rope ladder will be found in each room with full 
directions for adjusting it to the window ledge. 

In the pause which followed this startling announcement, three pairs of 
sleepy-looking eyes exchanged glances, and ill-repressed laughter broke from 
three sadder but wiser girls. 



112 



" The Wisdom of the Foolish and the 
Folly of the Wise." 



'So much by way 
of introduction ' ' 




THE BATTLEFIELD 



" The Folly of the Wise. " 

Martha: "Oh, you have turned your room around." 
Nell: "No, we have just turned thing's around in the room." 

Elsie: "Lottie, I went to see j'ou this afternoon." 
Lottie (calmly) : "Well, I must not have been at home." 

B. Taylor (on her return from the inauguration): "I saw William 
Cullen Bryant in the parade ! " 

Rachel (on the housetop) : "Suffrage, no! 1 don't want a vote. I want 
a voter. ' ' 

Prof. Harrison in Geometry Class: "Now any idiot could see that these 
two angles are ecjual. " 

Buford Lyne (in Sociology) : "The statistics of a country depend upon 
infant morality. ' ' 

Two problems that we Seniors have to deal with : B. Y. Tyner and 
D. J. Dadmun. 

Katharine Bartenstein (eating her first olive): "Oh! it has something 
hard in it." 

Belle : ' ' Isn 't Miss von Hof sten from Chicago ? ' ' 
Sam : ' ' No, indeed ! she is from Illinois. ' ' 

Louise Henley (to the wit editor) : "Come to me for anything that is 
needed in the wit column." 

Agnes: "What disease do you say a peraon has when they steal things 
belonging to other people?" 

Myrtis (quickly) : "Why hookworm." 

Elsie King (to a Senior, September 15, 1912) : "This evening down 
town, the boys kept calling me a rat. What did they mean?" 

Miss Wortham : "I didn't have to come here this year. I could have 
got married. 

Rat (interested) : "Why didn't you?" 

Miss Wortham: "First, because no one has asked me; second, because 
my modesty forbids my asking anyone, and third, ray mother and friends 
think I am too young to take the fatal step." 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Sain : ' ' Sprout, where is Katharine ? " 

Sprout : ' ' She has gone to Cabinet meeting. ' ' 

May: "Oh! how lovely! did she take supper there?" 

Miss Graves (in Physiology) : "How do you get the temperature of the 
liver ? ' ' 

Nell Henry (suavely) : "Swallow the thermometer." 

Miss Rachel Pearce (speaking of the Anniial) : "I am delirious for the 
Annual to come out. ' ' ( She looks it. ) 

One of the faculty: "Miss D. says when she tells the girls to refrain 
from talking they keep right on." 

Mrs. H. : "Well what can you expect, when Miss F. tells them in music 
to refrain means do it again ! ' ' 

Why do boys like to fish at the Normal School? 
Because Pykes are found there. 

H. Daniel's advice to Juniors: "Don't read reference books, borrow 
some one 's notes the night before exams. ' ' 

Mr. Tyner's advice to Seniors: "Take your time, take your time, just 
take your time. 

But once we tried, and came out with a 49. 

Mr. Tyner (in Philosophy of Education Class — to Miss Buford) : "Which 
is the better fitted to keep house, the girl who has kept house for several 
years without having taken a course in Domestic Science, or the girl who goes 
off to school and takes a course in Domestic Science?" 

Buford (shyly) : "I don't know, I haven't tried it yet." 

Miss Withers (in class) : "What do we put in bread to make it rise?" 
Alice Chilton : ' ' Carbohydrates. ' ' 

Nell: "Why, hello! Catharine, have j'ou been in swimming?" 
Catharine (with bathing cap on and suit in her hand) : "Yes." 
Nell : ' ' Did you get wet ? ' ' 
Catharine: "No, the water was dry." 

Clerk: "What kind of shoe will you have. Miss Nance?" 
Fanny : ' ' Something suitable for ' Ware. ' ' ' 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Quiz 



y 



HAT kind of chocolate does Katharine Rice prefer? — Hurst. 
What does Sue Walker dream about? — Bill. 
Why does Helen Daniel enjoy visiting in the country? — 
She likes Acres. 

Why is Alice Chilton always rising up in music class? — 
She rather likes a Downing. 

With what was Gay Wilson struck ? — With an Elbow. 
What holds the roof on a house ? — Ask Jane Garth. 
Who will be the first to catch Ruth Lord ?— Look out for the Miller. 
Why doesn't Belle Pearce like to go to church on Sunday? — She expects 
to become a Christian an.yway. 

Why did Annie Nicholas enjoy her discussion in History of Education ? — 
It was about the University of Virginia. 

Wliat is Mary Chesley's favorite occupation? — Pow(e)ing. 
Why is there a hole in the rug in front of the bureau of Alice Finney's 
room? — Ask Emma. 

Why is "Virginia" a leading State? — Because of her "Fleet." 
What is the school's largest jewel? — "Pearl." 

Why is Clara Morgan like a Chinese girl ? — Because she is fond of ' ' Rice. ' ' 
Why is Mrs. Chew like the man at a railroad crossing? — Because when 
she comes to a crossing on the hall, she alwaj'S stops, looks and listens. 
Where does "Bee" go every day? — To the "Graves." 
Wliat did the Cook give Miss Dadmun as a parting gift ? 



Lost 

At midnight, Charlotte Rice in the lard can. 

In Lucile Brown's room, many, many boxes of pills. 

Between the Normal School and Mrs. Tankard 's, Emma Lankford 's heart. 

By Mr. Chesley — his hair pins. 

A gym class — Miss Graves. 

A woolyworm — Miss Jackson. 

Some sleep — Miss Dadmun. 

An opportunity to spoon — The crushes. 

A jar of preserves — Mary Snead. 

A white pump — Ula Cluverius. 

The Pulman home, the fourth of March — Mr. Chandler. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Found 

Bj' Louise Henley, an eavesdropper on the back steps. 

Bertha and Ella Garnett together. 

One little pig ; owner apply to Mrs. Russell. 

Annie Foster in the bathroom with a dinner bell. 

By Miss Dadmun, an unearthly shriek coming from above. 

By Mrs. Chew, extraordinary behavior on the halls. 

A mystery — Miss Fraser's handbag. 

By the measly bunch, a desperate feeling. 

By Nell Ford, a kimono belonging to ' ' every little movement. 

A red hat; owner apply to Mrs. Chew. 

A "weaver," by Angle Bray. 

A "Junco"- — Bertie Cralle. 

A nest of "Tee-hee'(s) " — Emma Lankford. 

A "Roch," by Agnes James. 

A "new bill," by Ella Garnett Hoskins. 

A ladder, by Mr. Harrison. 

A "Blossom," by Martha Fleet. 

A good time for a "Row(e)," by M. W. Johnson. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Don'ts 

Don't study by electric lights, tliej' injure your eyes. Cut up till they 
go out and study by a candle. 

Don't remember any of Mr. Hamlet's lecture. "Simply take note." 

Don't bother Mary Warner, or you will hear Angle Bray. 

Don't primp so much, there are no boys around. 

Don 't feed the birds. Save the food for poor, starving Normal school girls. 

Don't sleep in your own room at night. You won't have to make up 
your bed in the morning. 

Don't crush, doctors pronounce it unsanitary. 

Don't sing to Lou, Agnes will get jealous. 

Don't expect high marks; then you won't be disappointed. 

Don't let a teacher frighten the boys on the street with you. 

Don't get up before the breakfast bell rings. Early rising is injurious 
to health. 

Don't leave the halls before 12 p. m. ; you might miss all the fun. 

Don 't avoid measles ; we all want it. 

Don't have your picture put in the Annual, it isn't stylish. 

Don't ask Mrs. Chandler to play croquet, you will surely insult her. 

Don't, under any circumstances let any trash get in the scrap baskets 
on the hall, while there is any room for it on the floor. 

"Don't stop your auto with a crank," says Mr. Harrison, "run it into a 
telephone pole, it requires more science." 

Don 't ask permission to go to town, it worries Miss Forbes. Go without it. 

Don't ever straighten up your room. It will deprive you of Mrs. Chew's 
delightful correspondence. 

Don't forget that Psychology depends on other things being equal. 

Don't molest Dee Walker, her crush may hurt you. 

Don't wear a roat down to breakfast. You may not need it. 

Don't put you history papers in Room 2. It's much easier to knock 
at 109! 

Don't lower your voices after the lights go out. The faculty would 
miss your delightful ( ? ) conversation. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



out. 
burg. 



Wanted 

Wanted — by Mrs. Chew, absolute silence on the halls. 

Wanted — by Emma Lankford, a vocal music lessou every day. 

Wanted — by Miss Fraser, round flute-like tones. 

Wanted — by the Second Year Class, the trophy cup. 

Wanted — by Martha Fleet, a Pi Kappa Alpha "frat" pin. 

Wanted — by Miss Stone, an outline which will make the big points stand 

Wanted — by Mr. Hamlet, excommunication of all boys from Fredericks- 



Wanted — by Miss Forbes, a padded bag in which to carry her keys. 

Wanted — to know the color of Mary Deierhoi's hair. 

Wanted — by Mr. Chandler, a Latin class that will catch his point. 

Wanted — by Miss Jackson, Narcissus bulbs that will produce blossoms. 

Wanted — to know why does the morning watch ? 

Wanted — by Elsie Coleman and Elizabeth Billingsley, a "crush" of 
their own "Sex." 

Wanted — to know why the fate of the Normal School girls depends on 
' ' Hamlet 's Soliloquy. ' ' 

Wanted — by Catherine Ware, one Chandler crab. 

Wanted — the name of the author of the following verse : 

Mary, Mary, quite contrary. 

How do your lovers go? 
Handsome eyes, cheery smiles. 
And true hearts all in a Eowe. 

Wanted — to know, does Mr. Russell when a wind storm strikes Fred- 
ericksburg. Also information as to whether Miss Withers in hot weather. 

Wanted — to know where Rice grows by the Sea(y). 

Wanted — to know if anything personal is meant by the amount of brains 
that are given us to eat. 

Wanted — to know why Mary Donnaly always follows a straight "Lyue. " 

Wanted — to know what secret order Emma likes best — the Masons. 

Wanted by Mr. Tyner — "A new conception as a whole." 

Wanted by Miss Hinman — Measles. 

Wanted by K. Bartenstein — An inspiration. 

Wanted bj' Annie Latane Ware and Ethel Ta.ylor — One pound of tea 
infusion. 

Wanted to know by Grace Edwards — Whj- somcboch/ alwa.vs "picks on 
her?" 

119 



THE BATTLEFIELD 








Medical 

INFIRMARY STAFF (Jail Force) 



Judge : Dr. Smith Policeman : Miss Forbes 

Jailors: Miss Spencer and Miss Segar 

Saturday, March 15, 1913: Ten girls sent to jail for fifteen days. 

Punishment for Misbehavior: An extra day in prison. 

Offences Punished by Imprisonment: Unlawful possession of measles 



Required by Each Measley Jail Bird: One acrobatic stunt before 
release. 

Refreshment : A piece of glass to suck. 

Amusements of "Measley Bunch": Playing flinch, dominoes and 
checkers. 

\ I. You must keep away from the windows. 

I II. Don 't dare go near the curtain. 
Rules for the "Measley Bunch "■{ III. Always stay in your room. 

I IV. Cold bath every day. 

I V. Temperature taken twice daily. 

[VI. Throat gargle twice every hour. 

Notes : 
"Doctor, please don't give me that medicine, it gives me hysterics." — 
L. L. M. 

120 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Miss Forbes: "Now you must gargle your throats every hour. Do you 

know how 1 ' ' 

New Girl: "No, ma'am, I've never gargled." 

Miss Forbes: "Well, I'll give you an ocular demonstration." 

New Girl: "Oh, do I have to have that, Miss Forbes. You haven't 

given that to another single girl ! ' ' 

Dr. Smith (suspecting flat foot) : "What kind of shoes do you wear?" 

Miss G. B. : "Shoes! Why, Doctor, I have a pair of patent leather 

pumps, some white ones, some tan ones and one pair of pink party slippers!" 

The largest "Pearl" in the world is the "Measley Bunch's Side Show." 

Sodium Bicarbonate and Its Usages : Ask Miss Hiiiman. 

Virginia Gordon's Complication: "Grape Juice" on the brain. 

She laughed her girlish laughter — and the moment after 
She sneezed the fatal sneeze — it's the measles, if you please. 




ON HIS WflY"^ 






THE BATTLEFIELD 




"I know I have heard the biggest secret in school! Well — yes, but you 
must promise not to breathe it to a soul. Annie Scott is going to be married 
directly after school is out, and during Commencement the girls are going to 
give her a hose shower. ' ' 

"Listen, Nell, don't dare say anything about this, because I don't think 
Mr. Russell wants it to get out in town; but Belle said that Katharine said 
that Miss Plinman told her that Mr. Russell said in faculty meeting last night, 
that there was to be a lecture out here verj' soon." 

"Really there is no limit to what you can hear in this school. Well, they 
say — though, of course, I don't believe it; but, anyway, don't you tell, because 
it was told to me confidentially — that one of the teachers said in class this morn- 
ing that she had been told by Mr. Russell that any girl could take measles for an 
elective the second term." 

Julia Keaton: "Listen, Bertha, Ruth told me, but we had better keep 
quiet about it, that she saw Mrs. Chew coming out of Isabel Willis's closet, 
and what do you suppose she was looking for? Brooms." 

"Oh! let me tell .you something, girls — but please don't let it go any 
farther — Well, Bessie Jesse said that Miss Forbes told her that Miss Dadmuu 
went to Washington on March 3rd, to be in the Suffragette Parade!" 

It is vaguely hinted that Miss Ilinman has a new dress which isn't 
brown — Stranger things niaij have happened. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 



Elizabeth said that Dr. Smith joined the Rifle Club because it was a 
lawless band. 

Louise Henley got 100 on a chemistry test ! Mr. Hamlet : ' ' Wonders 
will never cease." 

"We got it from good authority that one of the girls on the Varsity term 
was wearing Mr. Harrison's diamond — perhaps. 

If you could hear Mr. Chandler reading Cicero, you would think it was 
the old fellow himself. 

The conversation at the faculty table lools so interesting, that the girls 
burn with curiosity to hear it. It is said that the girls at one table had actually 
moved within two feet of the faculty before they were discovered. 

Mr. Chandler has such a comforting way of dealing with his classes; for 
instance, when Lillian Haislip had seventeen mistakes in her Latin prose, he 
wrote her the most cheering little note, commending her great improvement. 



THE BATTLEFIELD 




Closing Week 

HE sun is shilling bright 
With such glorious, radiant liglit 

As is only seen in June. 
Birds are singing in the trees ; 
Flowers are blooming on the leas; 
The world's in tune. 

Tlie girls of the Normal School, 
Freed from every binding rule, 

Are wandering all around. 
Some are crying, "An exam! 
Unless we begin to cram, 

Our doom will sound!" 



Some have nothing much to do 
But hear, ' ' Oh, if I were you. 

How soon for home I 'd start ! ' ' 
Still these faithful stay along 
To raise sweet Commencement song 

Ere thej' depart. 

The Seniors soon will leave. 
How we other girls will grieve ! 

Though some comfort we have found. 
Other girls will come next year. 
And the same good, merry cheer 

Afar resound. 



True, some happy days are o'er. 
But we'll meet again once more, 

And again play basketball. 
We will take the same dear walks, 
Listen as the same voice talks, 

In the fall. 

Jennie Cowell. 



State Normal School 

Fredericksburg^ Va. 

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Rxpenses as Near Actual Cost as Possible 
Free Tuitioji to Those Who Expect to Teach 

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President 



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3 per cent Compound Interest paid on Savings Accounts. 



Commercial State Bank, 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



S. W. SOMERVILLE, President 
GEORGE W. SHEPHERD. Cashier 
W. MAYO SMITH, Assistant Casliie 



We T. N. BRENT STORE 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 

41 



Wearing 
Apparel 

for 
Women 
Misses 

and 

Children 

A Specialty 




CAROUNE JEWELRY and OPTICAL CO. 

BOWUNG GREEN. VA. 

A. B. Chandler. Jr.. Pres. T. R. Proctor. Sec.-Treas. 

(a) Our Stock: Everytlune in the Jewelry and 
Optical line. 

(b) Our Motto: Absolutely no misrepresentation 
about anything. 

(c) Our Prices: Lower than those of city jewelers. 
NOTE: We will mail to any Normal School student or 
members of their family or their friends a memorandum 
of jewelry articles on approval. You see before you 
buy, and at no cost to you. 



The Northern Neck Mutual Fire Association 

of Virginia 
IRVINGTON, VIRGINIA 

Insures Farm Dwellings, Barns, etc., for 
one-half cost in Old Line Companies, and 
gives cheapest insurance on Stores. Fac- 
tories. Shops and Property in incorporated 



le for information. Incorporated March 4, 18 

Business Conlined to the State of Virgioia 






<lA 



RT PRINTERS 
•^ SPECIALIZE 



0»r Specialty is COLLEGE ANNUALS, 
CATALOGUES and BOOKLETS 

■ j^OR the proper handling of College Annuals, Catalogues, View 
■*• Booklets, Magazines, etc., it is essential that the printer have a 
true conception of the purpose of this character of printing and an 
organization of specialists to plan and supervise the execution of the 
work, as well as proper equipment to poduce it in a suitable manner. 
C From the time a contract of this nature is placed w^ith us until 
delivery is made all details of the work are handled by men who 
have gained from close study and long experience an accurate 
knowledge of the requirements of College Pri?iting, and who have at 
hand all the necessary materials w^ith which to work. C. We handle 
all parts of the work— Mf Illustrating, Designing, Engraving, Printing, 
and Binding of the above mentioned lines and solicit your considera- 
tion of our quality before placing your contract. C. W^e will give 
you suggestions that will save you more money than you can save 
by placing your contract with the printer who features " prices." 

THIS ANNUAL IS ONE OF OUR PRODUCTS 

Dulaney-Boatwright Co., Inc. 

810-812 CHURCH STREET LYNCHBURG, VA. 



'^®' B. GOLDSMITH & SON '^'^ 

ESTABLISHED OVER HALF A CENTURY 

OLD RELIABLE CLOTHIERS AND HABERDASHERS 

S. N. S. PENNANTS AND PILLOW COVERS 

(special inducement to students) 
WE RESPECTFULLY SOLICIT YOUR VALUED PATRONAGE 

B. GOLDSMITH & SON 

MARKET CORNER. MAIN STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



ADAMS'S BOOK STORE 

The best oj- everything in Student Supplies, Spaulding Sweaters 
and Tennis Goods, Waterman Fountain Pens, High-Grade 
Stationery, Pennants and Pillow Tops, New and Second- 
Hand Books. 

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME 



?■■•••••••• 


Wr have 


made an extra effort in secur 


ng for 


this SPRING and SUMMER the most 


■••••••——: 

i 

com- ? 


4 pU 


tc- liue of dependable and up-to-date mer 


chandis 


3 we have e 


ver shown anv previous s 


eason, • 




h as shoes 


in all the newest shapes an 


J leathe 


rs — such styles as vou will find onlv 


here. j 




Special li 


ne of Hosierv, Shirtwaists, 


Laces, 


Embroiderie 


s, Underwear, Kimonos, 


Neck- 4 




ar, Tiunks, 


Suit-cases, Umbrellas, and so 


forth. 






• 




We extend a cordial invitation to Norn 


al School Students 


and the general public to 


make • 


i th- 


s store theii 


headquarters, as a visit to the BIG 


BRIGHT STORE will convince you that it ? 


• pa 


■s to buy wl 


ere Best Goods at Lowest Pri 


ces and 


Efficient Sc 


rvice are rendered to all. 


i 






E. M 


. CURTIS 






[ 215 COMMERCE STREET 

i 






FREDERICKSBURG 


v.. 1 



FEUERHERD'S 



Ice Cream and Confectionery 
823 MAIN STREET 



If it's Furniture, Mat- 
tings, Rugs, Trunks, and 
House-furnishing goods, 
or Picture Frames See 
YOUNG FURNITURE CO. 

FREDERICKSBURG. VA. 



Incorporated 1851 

MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



AGENCY FOR VIRGINIA 
CHAS. B. RICHARDSON. General Agent 



RICHMOND 



WILLIAM BERNARD 

SPECIAL AGENT 
FREDERICKSBURG. VA. 

CONSULT US BEFORE PLACING YOUR LIFE INSURANCE 



DINSMORE'S TRAINING OF CHILDREN 

By John Wirt Dmsmure, A. M., Profes<;or of Pedagfogy and Dean of the Normal School of Berea Collece. Berea, 
Ky. Author of "Teaching a District School." 

Sl.OO 

This new book for teachers furnishes sound instruction on the training of children, 
based upon well-known and fundamental truths. The aim is to give teachers a better 
understanding of children, and consequently to enable them to make their work in the class- 
room more intelligent, more sympathetic, and more effective. It includes as much of 
elementary psychology as is necessary, and possesses many commendable features not found 
in more technical works. The practical is happily combined with the theoretical in a man- 
ner that is interesting as well as easy of comprehension. The book is not an exhaustive 
treatise, which can be put to no further use, but is confined to facts and principles which 
will be of great benefit to teachers and parents. 

Copies sent postpaid on receipt of price 

American Book Company 

NEW YORK CINCINNATI CHICAGO 



PiTc Jo SiiirifO(g(lil 1 
DENTIST 



Wi 1=2 Mmm 
iaiffirklkg!bifflri„ 



•••■••-•x 


•■••———••••••••—■-' 




Phor 


e. Office 63 Phon. 


. Residence 243-L | 




J®IlQ!fQ P. 


i« 1 




DENTIST j 


Fr©(dl®ridkgIb)iE!!ris, 


¥nrii!Sinf) i 



Firnadlimiiini MunaiilliieftiioirniiDl €®, 

WHOLESALERS 

HIGH GRADE BUTTER AND CHEESE 



Ciiirdlnnaiil FdnagnpE^g 

Absolute Safety 
Conservatism 
Square Dealing 
Courteous Treatment 

This is insured by a Board of 
Directors who direct and give all 
matters their careful attention. 



Capital $30,000.00 Surplus $3,000.00 



lAMl 



©®|p)®gnft wndiii 

The 

National 

Bank 



strongest Bank 
in the city 



Frddlgroeikilbiari,, Viiriiiaiii 



Girls — Please Marry 

Some nice saw-mill bachelor so 
we can sell him all his supplies, 
saws, engines etc. We also 
carry a full line of cutlery and 
household articles for your up- 
to-date home. 

FRANK K. HLER, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hardware and Machinery Supplies 



Md., Del. & Va. Ry. Co. 



lor Sharp 

NORFOLK ROUTE. 
Saturday 2 p 



. Thursday for Baltin 



Your Trade Solicited 

The largest and most attractive stock of BUILDING MATERIAL in Fredericksburg can be 
found in our Store and Ware Rooms, including STAG SEMI-PASTE PAINT, one gallon 
makes two. Most all goods bought by the car load, consequently are sold at lowest price. 



lASTElS^ Mmm BU Wmi^nA^hmwi. ¥i!» 



Laundry 
Equipment 

You will find American Laundry 
Equipment in the leading Schools, 
Hotels, Hospitals and Institutions 
all over the country as well as in the 
progressive custom laundries. 

We will be glad to talk over your 
laundry problems with you. 

Write our nearest office. 



T6e A)}ierica?i Laundry 
Macbme?y Company 



New York 



Chi, 



Cincinnal! 



J. R. Rawlings 

DEALER IN 

Farmers' Supplies and 
General Merchandise 

AGENT FOR 

Walter A. Wood Binders 

Mowers and Rakes 

Disc Harrows 

Disc Cultivators 

Thornhill Wagons 

Rubber Roofing 

Anything Needed by the Farmer. 



J. R. Rawlings 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 




RICHMOND, FREDERICKSBURG & POTOMAC RAILROAD 

SOLID THROUGH TRAINS .T^T^ "™" " ™- 

„...„ nr™,n.„ «.«--^-r« ERICKSBURG, AND NEW 

DAILY BETWEEN MJ^S^ 

YORK CITY. 

SCHEDULE 

Leaves Richmond 12:01 noon, daily; Fredericksburg 1:28 p. m., due Wash- 
ington 2:45 p. m., Baltimore 4:00 p.m., West Philadelphia 6:00 p.m., 
New York (7th Avenue and 32nd street) 8:00 p. m. Returning, train 
leaves New York (7th Avenue and 32nd street) 11:08 a. m.. West Philadel- 
phia 1:20 p. m., Baltimore 3:23 p. m., Washington 4:45 p. m., due 
Fredericksburg 6:01 p. m., Richmond 7:35 p. m. 

ALL STEEL ELEaRICALLY LIGHTED COACHES, PARLOR, CLUB AND DINING CARS ENTERING THE PENNSYLVANIA R. 

R. STATION IN THE HEART OF NEW YORK CITY. MANY OTHER TRAINS AT CONVENIENT HOURS. 
For full inf crmation regarding rates, schedules, etc., apply to the undersigned: 
W. p. TAYLOR, Traffic Manager, C. C. COX, Agent, 

Richmond, Va. Fredericksburg, Va. 



THE FARMERS AND MERCHANTS STATE BANK 

Fredericksburg, Virginia 
WHAT IT HAS DONE and WHAT IT IS DOING 

During the six years it has been in business, its surplus and profit 
account has reached $30,000.00 in addition to paying its stockholders six 
annual dividends, and its deposits have grown to equal those of any bank 
in this city. 

THE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

of this Bank have been paid more than $35,000.00 interest on their 
balances and these accounts can be checked on when desired. 

THE ASSETS OF THIS INSTITUTION 

are composed of first-class real estate loans, State, County of Spottsyl- 
vania and City of Fredericksburg Bonds, and demand and short time 
gilt edge commercial and collateral paper. In addition to this, its cash 
reserve account is always from 20 to 30 per cent, of its deposits. 

CAPITAL $50,000,00 SURPLUS $S0,000.00 

RESOURCES $800,000.00 

M. G. W^ILLIS, President JNO. F. GOULDMAN, Jr., Cashier 



GEORGE W. HEFLIN 



PLUMBING 

TINNING 

GAS and STEAM 

FITTING 



COOK STOVES 
and RANGES 



Fredericksburg 



Virginia 



M. S. Chancellor 

DEALER IN' 

wagons, carts, buggies, 
binders, corn shellers, 
cutting boxes, etc. 
Mccormick mowers and 
binders. superior disc 

DRILLS that are SUPERIOR. 
FARM IMPLEMENTS OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



CHANCELLOR 
He Makes the Price 



M. S. Chancellor 

THE FARMERS SUPPLY STORE 
Commerce St., Fredericksburg, Va. 



CHESLEY & GARNER 

Wholesale Grocers 

Agents for Dupont's Powder and Dynamite 
FREDERICKSBURG - - VIRGINIA 



M. G. WILLIS 

DEALER IN 

High Grade Fertilizers 
Agricultural Chemicals 
Farm Seeds of All Kinds 



FREDERICKSBURG 



VA. 



iFr^Jirrtrkaburg 

An Old-fashioned Curriculum, in 

an Olden Time Town 

For Catalogue Address PRESIDENT 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 



E. G. HEFLIN 

ARCHITECT 

AND 

BUILDER 



23 LAW BUILDING 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



,.,.. 






• 


% 


COOK! 


I 


? 


i 
1 


Photographer 

913 EAST MAIN STREET 
RICHMOND, VA, 

Orders filled for Duplicates of Pictures 
in this Annual 




represent the best in piano construction — the ideal toward 
which all should strive. 

The rich quality of tone, the absolute evenness of scale, 
the responsive touch, and the artistic design of case, make the 
STARR unique in its excellence. It is the delight of all who 
appreciate perfection. 

Catalogs showing the various Starr models maj^ be had 
on request. 

THE STARR PIANO CO. 



Factory and Executive Offices 
RICHMOND, IND. 



814 MAIN STREET 

FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



CHARLES M. ROBINSON 



ARCHITECT 



Architect of the Fredericksburg 
State Normal School Buildings 



RICHMOND 



VIRGINIA 




R. A. Kishpaugh 

Books 
Stationery 
Printing 



ALL KINDS OF PRINTING FOR 
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Latest Addition to the Graded Classics Series 

"TELL ME A STORY" 

A FIRST READER 

Bj Lida B. McMurry, Primary Critic 
Teacher^ Illinois State Normal College. 

"This greatest addition to the well-known 
"Graded Classics Series' is in beautiful 
clear print and tasteful bindinc. and is 
filled with lively stories charmingly told 
and illustrated by lots of the most ph-asint' 
pictures, of which a dozen or so are in 
colors. To see it is to feel at once the 
spell of its vivacity and charm." 

— N. C. EDUCATION 

112 pp. Full of charming illustrations 
mostly in colors. Price 30 cents. 

B. F. JOHNSON PUBLISHING CO. 

Atlanta Richmond Dallas 



The Journal 

rUE PAPER FOR ALL THE PEOPLE 



THE 



Evening Journal 

The Largest Paid Circulation of 

any Daily in the City 

Subscription Price, 25c per month. Per 

year in admance, $2. 75. 



The Fredericksburg 
Jou?ytal 

(Tri- Weekly) 

The Largest Paid Circulation of any 

Tri- Weekly in the City 

SL 00 per year in advance 



Jacob Umlauf 

UPHOLSTERER and MAT- 
TRESS MANUFACTURER 

1326 West Broad Street 
Richmond, Va. 

CL I can furnish you all 
kinds of mattresses, pil- 
lows, etc. 

CL Old ones made over 
like new. 

C Furniture repaired and 
reupholstered in the best 
manner. 

YOUR ORDERS SOLICITED 



Larkin & Rodgers 



DEALERS IN 



Ssiallg' Fusroanilniniiiili 



822 Main St., 
Fredericksburg - Virginia 



R. G. HILLDRUP 

LIVERY, FEED and* 
SALE STABLES 



Hacks and 

Automobiles 

at all 

Trains and 
Steamboats 



I>l\on<. 2:?4 C.ll.llm.I•<^e St.. 

FREDKRICKSBllRd - VA. 



Vmrmtf Store 

THE LEADER OF LOW PRICES 



BIG LINE OF 
SHOES, 
CLOTHING, 
HATS and CAPS, 
DRY GOODS 
and NOTIONS. 
The best candy for 20c per lb. 



il® Mania Strmmi 



Brompton Stock Farm 

REGISTERED 

Jersey and Guernsey 
Cattle 

Berkshire Hogs 

Bronze Turkeys 

Improved Fowls 



M. B. ROWE & CO. 



Fredericksburg, Va. 



.SANITARY 

INSIDE & OUT 





Leonard Cleaiiable Refriuerator sulci only by iJc-li A- Bru. The Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet sold only by Bell A Bro. 

•*THE HOME." We furnish the Home throughout. Furniture, Carpets, Art Squares, Mattings, 

Linoleums, Refrigerators, Screen Doors and Screen Windows, China. Gleissware, Etc. 

Write us for prices. Your patronage solicited. 

"Home Outfitters" W^. A. BELL & BRO. Fredericksburg, Va. 



Goolrick's Modern Pharmacy 



901 MAIN STREET 

^juality Drugs 

^iuality Soda 

^jtality Cigars 
Velvet Kind Ice Cream 

Martha Washington Candies 



Registered Pharmacist 

DAY OR NIGHT TO FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS 




QUALITY, STYLE and FIT 

Are the three essential qualities in Our Slices. 
OXFORDS; TAN. BLACK and WHITE. 
PUMPS; GUN METAL. RUSSIA CALF 
and PATENT COLT. - - $3.00 
WHITE DUCK PUMPS. $1.25 and up. 



J. E. TIMBERLAKE 

904 Main Street 



ESTABUSHED 1871 



. P. COL 



Dealer in all kinds of 



Painters' Supplies, Builders' 
Hardware and Plumbers' Sup- 
plies, Tarred and Rubber Roof- 
ing, Lime, Calcined Plaster, 
Cement, Nails, Cow Hair, 
Bricks, Etc. 

Tnia E®®&i 

¥ CrainBp ll®®inEii 

©ull^aiEinagdl M®®ll5i5ii 

asp: 



FREDERICKSBURG, VA. 



The Planters National Bank 

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



CAPITAL ^75,000 SURPLUS $15,000 



President 
M. B. ROWE 

/ ice- Presidents 
ALLEN SMITH R. CONROV VANCE 

Cas/uers 
W. J. FORD PAUL KARSTEN, Jr. H. B. LANE 

Directors 
F. C. BALDWIN ALEX BERGER GEO. FREEMAN, Jr. 

Dr. J. W. MASSEY M. B. ROWE HENRY WARDEN 

W. J. FORD 



The largest capital of any Bank in this city. 

The Planters National Bank offers every possible accommodation to its 
depositors. 

Attention is directed to the fact that this is the only National Bank in the 
city which pays interest on savings accounts. 

The students, the parents and friends are cordially invited to ask for any 
information needed. 



WRITE OR CALL ON US 

A SAVINGS ACCOUNT CAN BE STARTED WITH 

ONE DOLLAR 

3% Savings x4ccouiit 3% 



LEADERS OF SHLE AND fALUE 

TAILORED SUITS, 
SILKS, DRESS GOODS, 
MILLINERY, WASH 
GOODS, LINENS, 
DRESSES, KIMONOS, 
UNDER MUSLINS, 
HOSIERY 

A Trial Order Will Convince You 
C. W. JONES 

FREDERICKSBURG'S LARGEST STORE 



F. T. COVEY 



S. E. COVEY 



Coveys' Florists 

Bouquets and Funeral Designs 
furnished at short notice 

CUT FLOWERS A SPECIALTY 
Fredericksburg, Va. 



HOUSE PHONE 229 



STORE PHONE 282